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Which of the following two implementations, in terms of coding style: is better, and why?

UINT Fn1()
{
    HKEY hRegKey;

    if(RegOpenKeyEx(..., KEY_NAME, &hRegKey) != ERROR_SUCCESS)
        return ERROR_KEY_OPEN;
    if(RegQueryValueEx(hRegKey, VAL_A_NAME, ...) != ERROR_SUCCESS)
    {
        RegCloseKey(hRegKey);
        return ERROR_KEYVAL_A;
    }

    if(RegQueryValueEx(hRegKey, VAL_B_NAME, ...) != ERROR_SUCCESS)
    {
        RegCloseKey(hRegKey);
        return ERROR_KEYVAL_B;
    }

    RegCloseKey(hRegKey);
    return ERROR_SUCCESS;
}

UINT Fn2()
{
    UINT rVal;
    HKEY hRegKey;

    if(RegOpenKeyEx(..., KEY_NAME, &hRegKey) == ERROR_SUCCESS)
    {
        if(RegQueryValueEx(hRegKey, VALUE_A_NAME, ...) == ERROR_SUCCESS)
        {
            if(RegQueryValueEx(hRegKey, VALUE_B_NAME, ...) == ERROR_SUCCESS)
                rVal = ERROR_SUCCESS;
            else
                rVal = ERROR_KEYVAL_B;
        }
        else
            rVal = ERROR_KEYVAL_A;
        RegCloseKey(hRegKey);
    }
    else
        rVal = ERROR_KEY_OPEN;

    return rVal;
}

Also, is there a still better way?
Note: please do no confound to the snippet's specifics - emphasize on code flow and style.

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closed as not constructive by Blue Moon, Benj, Alexey Frunze, unwind, ArjunShankar Oct 1 '12 at 13:04

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2  
This answer would be different for C or C++, but you've tagged both. Also, this is a rather subjective question. –  Benj Oct 1 '12 at 12:43
    
Please answer - for a generic scenario. I did not transform the question to a more generic form to let it be more real. –  Ujjwal Singh Oct 1 '12 at 12:44
1  
This question has been asked before: Here and on Programmers.SE. Both times, answerers prefered an 'early return' (i.e. your first version) –  ArjunShankar Oct 1 '12 at 13:03
    
@ArjunShankar thanks for the pointers. But this case differs in the clean-up required before return. I have trimmed my question, and I think it remaining open would be useful for others with similar query. –  Ujjwal Singh Oct 1 '12 at 13:35

1 Answer 1

This is very much a matter of personal taste. I'd personally say neither look very good or are easy to follow. The form in C that I personally prefer is:

int
fn(void)
{
    struct foo *foo;
    int error = 0;
    if ((foo = foo_open(...)) == NULL)
        return FOO_ERROR_OPEN;
    if (foo_do_something(1)) {
        error = FOO_ERROR_1;
        goto out;
    }
    if (foo_do_something(2)) {
        error = FOO_ERROR_2;
    }
out:
    foo_close(foo);
    return error;
}

But as said, this is a matter of taste and there's as many opinions about this as there are programmers. I prefer this style because this is how a lot of code I've worked with early in my career has been written and that just makes it the most readable for me.

If I had to choose one of the styles you've presented, I'd go with 1, since 2 just looks messy because of the deep indentations. A rule of thumb I have is that readability decreases with indentation depth.

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hmm yes goto is not that bad of an option here. –  Ujjwal Singh Oct 1 '12 at 13:09
1  
@UjjwalSingh with one resource to free it's mostly overkill, but when you end up holding three locks and five temporarily allocated memory blocks in one function, goto really clears things up. –  Art Oct 1 '12 at 13:20
    
You are right - and I concluded it with the 1st. –  Ujjwal Singh Oct 1 '12 at 15:34

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