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I have an interface (move) that should move some shapes.

interface Move { move(); }
abstract class Shape : Move

class Circle : Shape
class Square : Shape
class Triangle : Shape

My doubt is, I must have an interface which moves Shapes but only Circle and Triangle should be able to be moved, so how do I "remove" the interface from Square? Should I remove the interface from Shape and add it manually on Circle and Triangle? I'm kinda confused with this. Hope someone can help me out.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 32 down vote accepted

You should setup your classes like this:

interface IMovable { move(); } 
abstract class Shape : { } 

class Circle : Shape, IMovable { } 
class Square : Shape { } 
class Triangle : Shape, IMovable { } 

If not every shape can be moved then Shape must not implement the interface. Also note I renamed your interface to IMovable, it's not a huge deal but it's more accepted and a better naming convention.

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4  
This. The answer to the question "how do I un-inherit some base behavior" is always "don't inherit from it in the first place". –  KeithS Oct 1 '12 at 14:46
    
@KeithS, that is correct. Stopping inheritance is just the inverse way to look at inheritance. So, hopefully this will help the OP think the other way moving forward. :) –  Michael Perrenoud Oct 1 '12 at 14:47
4  
@Mike, how about IMovable? –  smartcaveman Oct 1 '12 at 14:56
    
@smartcaveman, are you saying renaming the interface to IMovable? –  Michael Perrenoud Oct 1 '12 at 16:35
1  
@Mike, yeah. Because it's not a move, it's an object that can be moved. It seems to follow convention more: e.g. IEnumerable, IQueryable, IObservable, IEquatable, IComparable, IFormattable, etc. –  smartcaveman Oct 1 '12 at 16:51

You can't remove an interface from an inheritance tree.

What you model appears to need two abstract classes - Shape and MovableShape.

interface IMove { move(); } 
abstract class Shape : {} 
abstract class MovableShape : IMove, Shape {} 

class Circle : MovableShape{}
class Square : Shape{}
class Triangle : MovableShape{}
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3  
This should be the accepted answer. –  Nadir Sampaoli Oct 1 '12 at 13:35
2  
@NadirSampaoli, you're opinion is duly noted, but be careful as this would turn into a very subjective conversation. One thing to note is that I +1'd this answer as well because it's quite correct. –  Michael Perrenoud Oct 1 '12 at 14:25
2  
@Mike I apologize, in fact my comment sounds bold; I should have appended an "in my opinion". –  Nadir Sampaoli Oct 1 '12 at 14:35
1  
+1 @Mike - Both answers are correct. Which one is more suitable for the OP? There isn't enough information in the question for an answer to be determined. –  Oded Oct 1 '12 at 14:35
1  
@Mike - When it comes to reputation, I can't really comment too much, only to say that on the day to day its become irrelevant to me. Community is important and trying to foster it instead of seeing the site as a "competition" is right. (BTW - there is the Sportsmanship badge to encourage community thinking). –  Oded Oct 1 '12 at 14:42

You should make yourself more familiar with the ideas behind interfaces, classes and OO in general. What you are trying to tell is the following:

  • Every shape can be moved.
  • A Square is a shape.
  • But a Square cannot be moved.

Obivously that makes not sense. So you have to adjust your class design. Either every shape can be moved, that Shape (and Square) should implement Move, or not every shape can be moved, then Shape should not implement Move.

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Try this out:

interface IMove { move(); }
abstract class Shape { }

class Circle : Shape, IMove { }
class Square : Shape { }
class Triangle : Shape, IMove { }
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Other option could be just implement IMove.Move method in the Shape class and throw a NotSupportedException by default.

public abstract class Shape : IMove 
{
     public virtual void Move()
     { 
         throw new NotSupportedException();
     }
}

So at the end of the day, "any shape could be movable" but "a movable shape should provide its own implementation of how to move it".

Finally, let's imagine there're a bunch of shapes that are moved in the same way. You'd create a DefaultMovableShape abstract class deriving Shape, which overrides Shape.Move virtual method.

public abstract class DefaultMovableShape 
{
     public override void Move()
     {
           // Do stuff
     }
}
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While this works, I'd advise against it unless your spec for the Move function explicitly state at the interface layer that Move will may throw an exception in the case it isn't applicable for the underlying object. Of course, at that point you should question why it implements the interface at all and you likely have a design issue (see accepted answer). –  Anthony Oct 1 '12 at 13:53
    
@Anthony I'm agreed. I just wanted to give an option. I believe that there're reasons to think that accepted answer is the right way of doing that, but also mine, in some situation, may done the job. It depends on how you think the problem: "a shape isn't movable" or "a shape may be movable". –  Matías Fidemraizer Oct 1 '12 at 14:20
    
@Anthony I've double-checked your comment. This statement should be in Shape class documentation nor IMove one. Shape "may move" because a Shape can provide an implementation of "how to move". So if you're trying to move a Shape that can't be moved, then this Shape "doesn't support moving". –  Matías Fidemraizer Oct 1 '12 at 14:23

The best answer will depend on what the use case and environment for these classes will be. As part of a team developing an app or framework, adopting the design patterns used by that team is preferable to seeking a 'perfect' solution, since it will make it easier for others to adopt and maintain your code.

How you expect these classes to be used and extended is also important. Would you expect 'Square' to need to be movable in the future? Is the movability of a Shape always static, or might it be more useful as a dynamic attribute? Does Move() have any value for classes that are not Shapes? If movability may be useful as a dynamic attribute, consider this:

public abstract class Shape
{
     public bool isMovable()
     {
         return false;
     }

     public virtual void Move()
     { 
         if (!isMovable() {
             throw new NotSupportedException();
         } else {
             throw new BadSubclassException();
         }
     }
}

Your subclasses can then override isMovable to provide either static or dynamic behavior, and can be further modified or subclassed over time, so long as your documentation makes clear that isMoveable should always precede a call to Move. The default behavior should be based on the expectations of others you expect to use your code, based on how they've implemented related design patterns.

A good example of the challenge of making these decisions can be found by looking at the history of how mutability of collection classes has evolved in different frameworks. There have been designs where the mutable classes (sets, arrays, dictionaries, etc.)have been the base class, with immutability implemented in subclasses, as well as the reverse. There are valid arguments for both approaches, as well as a dynamic approach, but the most important factor for the user of a framework is consistency, because what is correct is really a matter of what is easiest to use, providing safety and performance are not compromised.

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