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I have a extreme large file which have info in pattern:

 0 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>274</font>
 1 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>284</font>
 2 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>299</font>
 3 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>296</font>
 4 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>273</font>

I want change this line to

274
284
299
296
273

Pattern is:

'#4e9a06'>[0-9]*</font>

I used this:

perl -i.bak -pe 's/.*4e9a06//' copy.txt

but I still have:

'>274</font>
'>284</font>
'>299</font>
'>296</font>
'>273</font>
'>272</font>

I try use sed :

cat file.bak | sed 's/form>/ /g' > copy2.txt

But this isn't work. Can you help me in remove rest of chars? Thank for your answer.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Suppose you have a file named copy.txt, where your information is stored. Then you just run:

cat copy.txt |egrep -o ">[0123456789]+<"|tr -d  "<"|tr -d ">"

This prints the lines of the file, then outputs only matching part of the regex (not the whole line, as egrep does). Then you just cut off the "<" and ">", which is also matched.

-edit-

Maybe a bit more friendly syntax and some additional fixes.

cat copy.txt |egrep -o ">[1-9][0-9]*<"|tr -d  "<"|tr -d ">"

Here the number has to start with a digit from 1 to 9. Then other digits may or may not be present.

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... Just thank you. –  Bartosz Kowalczyk Oct 1 '12 at 13:22

Please try the following:

sed -e "s#.*>\([0-9]*\)</font>\$#\\1#" source.txt >out.txt
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I have solution which uses Python:

$ python -c 'import re,sys; print "\n".join(",".join(j for j in re.findall("06'\''>(.*)</fo", i)) for i in sys.stdin)' <xy
274
284
299
296
273

Not a nice program, but I intended to do it as one-liner.

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Please, don't parse html with regex.

cat<<EOF | html2text | perl -lne 'print for /int (\d+)/g'
0 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>274</font>
1 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>284</font>
2 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>299</font>
3 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>296</font>
4 <font color='#888a85'>=&gt;</font> <small>int</small> <font color='#4e9a06'>273</font>
EOF

Output :

274
284
299
296
273
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