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I have a hash of complex structure and I want to perform a search and replace. The first hash is like the following:

$VAR1 = {
  abc => { 123 => ["xx", "yy", "zy"], 456 => ["ab", "cd", "ef"] },
  def => { 659 => ["wx", "yg", "kl"], 456 => ["as", "sd", "df"] },
  mno => { 987 => ["lk", "dm", "sd"] },
}

and I want to iteratively search for all '123'/'456' elements, and if a match is found, I need to do a comparison of the sublayer, i.e. of ['ab','cd','ef'] and ['as','sd','df'] and in this case, keep only the one with ['ab','cd','ef']. So the output will be as follows:

$VAR1 = {
  abc => { 123 => ["xx", "yy", "zy"], 456 => ["ab", "cd", "ef"] },
  def => { 659 => ["wx", "yg", "kl"] },
  mno => { 987 => ["lk", "dm", "sd"] },
}

So the deletion is based on the substructure, and not index. How can it be done? Thanks for the help!!

Lets assume that I will declare the values to be kept, i.e. I will keep 456 => ["ab", "cd", "ef"] based on a predeclared value of ["ab", "cd", "ef"] and delete any other instance of 456 anywhere else. The search has to be for every key. so the code will go through the hash, first taking 123 => ["xx", "yy", "zy"] and compare it against the keys throughout the rest of the hash, if no match is found, do nothing. If a match is found, like in the case of 456 => ["ab", "cd", "ef"], it will compare the two, and as I have said that in case of a match the one with ["ab", "cd", "ef"] would be kept, it will keep 456 => ["ab", "cd", "ef"] and discard any other instances of 456 anywhere else in the hash, i.e. it will delete 456 => ["as", "sd", "df"] in this case.

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1  
Take a look at perldsc.. It is all about these stuffs only.. Specially hashes of hashes –  Rohit Jain Oct 1 '12 at 13:52
    
You should specify how the decision of which entry to keep is supposed to be made. –  darch Oct 1 '12 at 16:22
    
You asked me to look at this. All I can say is "What?" –  ikegami Oct 2 '12 at 7:12
    
Asking for your wisdom @ikegami...:) I have edited the question. The 'what' has been defined as 456 => ["ab", "cd", "ef"]. Now my question is how? –  Mahfuzur Rahman Pallab Oct 2 '12 at 7:58

1 Answer 1

Here is a solution that uses the smart match operator to perform the array comparison:

Update: as Borodin pointed out, my original code was wrong. This is the fixed version.

Update 2: Changed it to choose the values to keep based on a hash structure.

my $VAR1 = {
  abc => { 123 => ["xx", "yy", "zy"], 456 => ["ab", "cd", "ef"] },
  def => { 659 => ["wx", "yg", "kl"], 456 => ["as", "sd", "df"] },
  mno => { 987 => ["lk", "dm", "sd"] },
};

my %keep_values = (
    '456' => ['ab','cd','ef']
);

foreach my $outer_key (keys %$VAR1)
{
    foreach my $keepers (keys %keep_values)
    {
        if (exists $VAR1->{$outer_key}{$keepers} and 
            #use the smart match operator to compare arrays.
            !(@{$VAR1->{$outer_key}{$keepers}} ~~ @{$keep_values{$keepers}}))
        {
            delete $VAR1->{$outer_key}{$keepers};
        }
    }   
}

For more on the smart match operator, see perlop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot dan1111, problem is, i need the whole thing to be dynamic, so i cannot define $match_key or @match_array. It needs to be independent of any inputs given by me... –  Mahfuzur Rahman Pallab Oct 1 '12 at 14:44
    
Then you must clarify what is special about ['ab','cd','ef'] that makes you choose it over ['as','sd','df']. It's far from obvious –  Borodin Oct 1 '12 at 17:47
1  
This is very poor code. You don't have use strict or use warnings and don't declare $outer_hash. Also your variable $outer_hash is set to each key of %$VAR1, i.e. abc, def, mno, so $outer_hash->{$match_key} makes no sense –  Borodin Oct 1 '12 at 17:55
    
@Borodin, alright, lets say I am only keeping ['ab','cd','ef'] and deleting all other instances of the repitition, but I still have to go through all of the keys like '456' and '123' and so on... –  Mahfuzur Rahman Pallab Oct 2 '12 at 7:06
    
@Borodin, that was a brain dead mistake. I don't know how it happened; I actually tested this (!), but I must have looked at something wrong. As for strict and warnings, yes, I use those, but this is an excerpt, not a complete program. I have added a my declaration to $outer_hash, though this is not strictly necessary due to Perl's implicit localization of looping variables. –  dan1111 Oct 2 '12 at 8:45

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