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I've this kind of structure:

[
    array([ 0. ,  4.5,  9. ]),
    [
        array([ 100.,  120.,  140.]),
        [
            array([ 1000.,  1100.,  1200.]), 
            array([ 1200.,  1300.,  1400.])
        ],
        array([ 150.,  170.,  190.]),
        [
            array([ 1500.,  1600.,  1700.]), 
            array([ 1700.,  1800.])
        ]
    ]
]

(where arrays are numpy.arrays)

how to write a generator that give me:

(0, 4.5), (100, 120), (1000, 1100)
(0, 4.5), (100, 120), (1100, 1200)
(0, 4.5), (120, 140), (1200, 1300)
(0, 4.5), (120, 140), (1300, 1400)
(4.5, 9), (150, 170), (1500, 1600)
(4.5, 9), (150, 170), (1600, 1700)
(4.5, 9), (170, 190), (1700, 1800)

by now, the only thig I have is:

def loop_bin(bins):
    for i in range(len(bins)-1):
        yield [bins[i], bins[i+1]]
share|improve this question
    
What is array? Why is line 3 and 4 identical? –  hochl Oct 1 '12 at 13:48
    
array is np.array –  Ruggero Turra Oct 1 '12 at 13:51
    
Are you aware of itertools? docs.python.org/library/itertools.html –  Craig Wright Oct 1 '12 at 13:58
    
@CraigWright: yes, but this doesn't help me –  Ruggero Turra Oct 1 '12 at 14:16
1  
If this example is not representative, please describe exactly what wou want, i.e. for array([1,2,3,4]), produce (1,2), (2,3), (3,4)? Do the sublists always contain two or four elements? –  tobias_k Oct 1 '12 at 15:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about:

def foo(m):

  for i in range(0, len(m), 2):

    for j in range(len(m[i])-1):
      current = tuple(m[i][j:(j+2)])
      mm = m[i+1]
      if(len(mm) % 2 != 0 or (len(mm) > 1 and not type(mm[1][0]) is types.ListType)):
        currentl = mm[j]
        for k in range(0, len(currentl)-1):
          yield current, tuple(currentl[k:(k+2)])

      else:
        for res in foo(mm[2*j:2*j+2]):
          # this is for pretty print only
          if type(res) is types.TupleType and len(res)>1 and not type(res[0]) is types.TupleType:
            yield current, res
          else:
            # pretty print again
            c = [current]
            c+= res
            yield tuple(c)

The tuple things are for pretty print, in order to get closer to your example. I was not very sure on the criteria to use for detecting a leaf. Note also that I made my experiments with the following pythonic array:

arr = [
    [ 0. ,  4.5,  9. ],
    [
        [100.,  120.,  140.],
        [
            [ 1000.,  1100.,  1200.], 
            [ 1200.,  1300.,  1400.]
        ],
        [ 150.,  170.,  190.],
        [
            [ 1500.,  1600.,  1700.], 
            [ 1700.,  1800.]
        ]
    ]
]

rather than the numpy array given, but the changes to get things running with numarray should be straightforward.

share|improve this answer

looking at your situation i've broken it down into a few different types of iterations: overlap and paired (as well as regular iteration).

i then recursively traverse your tree structure in dopair which analyses the types to decide how it should iterate over the data it sees. the decision is based on whether we are processing a node (which contains a subtree) or a leaf (an array).

generator kicks it all off. izip allows us to iterate two generators at the same time.

from itertools import izip

class array(list):
    pass

arr = [
    array([ 0. ,  4.5,  9. ]),
    [
        array([100.,  120.,  140.]),
        [
            array([ 1000.,  1100.,  1200.]), 
            array([ 1200.,  1300.,  1400.])
        ],
        array([ 150.,  170.,  190.]),
        [
            array([ 1500.,  1600.,  1700.]), 
            array([ 1700.,  1800.])
        ]
    ]
]

# overlap(structure) -> [st, tr, ru, uc, ct, tu, ur, re]
def overlap(structure):
    for i in range(len(structure)-1):
        yield (structure[i],structure[i+1])

# paired(structure) -> [st, ru, ct, ur]
def paired(structure):
    for i in range(0,len(structure)-1,2):
        yield (structure[i],structure[i+1])

def dopair(first,second):
    if all(isinstance(x,array) for x in second): 
        for pa,ir in izip(overlap(first),second):
            for item in overlap(ir):
                yield pa, item
    else:
        for pa,(i,r) in izip(overlap(first),paired(second)):
            for item in dopair(i,r):
                yield (pa,) + item

def generator(arr):
    for pa,ir in paired(arr):
        for x in dopair(pa,ir):
            yield x

for x in generator(arr):
    print x
share|improve this answer

Use recursion to do it:

def foo( lst, path ):
    if type(lst[0]) != type(array([])):
        return [path+[(lst[0],lst[1])], path+[(lst[1],lst[2])]]

    i = 0
    ret = []
    while i < len(lst):
        node = lst[i]
        successor = lst[i+1] if i+1<len(lst) else None
        if type(node) == type(array([])):
            if type(successor) == list:
                children = successor
                ret.extend( foo( children, path + [(node[0], node[1])] ) )
                ret.extend( foo( children, path + [(node[1], node[2])] ) )
                i+=1
            else:
                ret.append( path + [(node[0], node[1])] )
                ret.append( path + [(node[1], node[2])] )
        i+=1
    return ret

Call foo( input, [] ) to calculate.

share|improve this answer
    
This produces 32 items instead of just 8. –  tobias_k Oct 1 '12 at 15:03
    
@tobias_k, yes, but I wonder if the sample list is complete... –  Marcus Oct 1 '12 at 15:10
    
the ouput is wrong –  Ruggero Turra Oct 1 '12 at 20:39

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