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As we known

uniq [options] [file1 [file2]]

It remove duplicate adjacent lines from sorted file1. The option -c prints each line once, counting instances of each. So if we have the following result:

     34 Operating System
    254 Data Structure
      5 Crypo
     21 C++
   1435 C Language
    589 Java 1.6

And we sort above data using "sort -1knr", the result is as below:

   1435 C Language
    589 Java 1.6
    254 Data Structure
     34 Operating System
     21 C++
      5 Crypo

Can anyone help me out that how to output only the book name in this order (no number)?

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3  
cut is the magic word (one of them). –  Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 1 '12 at 14:42
    
I think it will not work because there are several space in front of the number, how could you identify the field? Using "cut -d ' ' -f 2"? It will return nothing –  eleven Oct 1 '12 at 14:46
    
You can use cut -c, then. –  Carl Norum Oct 1 '12 at 15:25
    
For example "cut -c 9-", it will ignore the number, but we must know the exact number of characters in the count column –  eleven Oct 1 '12 at 15:34
    
Yes, we need to know the width to use cut. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 1 '12 at 16:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
uniq -c filename | sort -k 1nr | awk '{$1='';print}'
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What about not using "awk" command? Only use "uniq", "sort", "tr", "wc", "head", "tail" –  eleven Oct 1 '12 at 14:48
    
By the way, and "cut" –  eleven Oct 1 '12 at 14:49
    
You already explained why cut is no good in your comment to Michael Krelin. You could use the -c option, but I wouldn't like to depend on the exact number of characters in the count column. –  Barmar Oct 1 '12 at 14:53
    
cut isn't no good, but it's the simplest way. I find this solution fine and tool appropriate. Of course you can do something with while and read, but really, awk is exactly the right tool for the task. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 1 '12 at 16:45

You can also use sed for that, as follows:

uniq -c filename | sort -k -1nr | sed 's/[0-9]\+ \(.\+\)/\1/g'

Test:

echo "34 Data Structure" | sed 's/[0-9]\+ \(.\+\)/\1/g'
Data Structure

This can also be done with a simplified regex (courtesy William Pursell):

echo "34 Data Structure" | sed 's/[0-9]* *//'
Data Structure
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sed is always a good way to spell grep! –  William Pursell Oct 1 '12 at 17:13
1  
This could be greatly simplified: sed 's/[0-9]* *//g' –  William Pursell Oct 1 '12 at 17:14
    
Indeed!, although the one you posted (with *) did not work in my tests, it worked with + , I'm adding that to my answer, thanks :-) –  Nelson Oct 1 '12 at 17:25
    
You cannot have the g flag in the simplified version. That would munge titles like "20000 leagues under the sea". (My error in including it; muscle memory dies hard.) –  William Pursell Oct 1 '12 at 17:37
    
Ok, updated! thank you –  Nelson Oct 1 '12 at 17:48

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