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I'm looking for a way to reduce the length of a huge list with the Total function and a threshold parameter. I would like to avoid the use of For and If (coming from old habits).

Example : List that I want to "reduce" :{1,5,3,8,11,3,4} with a threshold of 5.

Output that I want : {6,11,11,7} That means that I use the Total function on the first parts of the list and look if the result of this function is higher than my threshold. If so, I use the result of the Total function and go to the next part of the list.

Another example is {1,1,1,1,1} with a threshold of 5. Result should be {5}.

Thanks!

EDIT : it is working but it is pretty slow. Any ideas in order to be faster?

EDIT 2 : the loop stuff (quit simple and not smart)

For[i = 1, i < Length[mylist] + 1, i++,
sum = sum + mylist[[i]];
  If[sum > Threshold ,
result = Append[result , sum]; sum = 0;   ];   ];

EDIT 3 : I have now a new thing to do. I have to work now with a 2D list like {{1,2}{4,9}{1,3}{0,5}{7,3}} It is more or less the same idea but the 1st and 2nd part of the list have to be higher than the thresold stuff (both of them). Example : If lst[[1]] and lst[[2]] > threshold do the summuation for each part of the 2D list. I tried to adapt the f2 function from Mr.Wizard for this case but I didn't succeed. If it is easier, I can provide 2 independant lists and work with this input f3[lst1_,lst2_,thres_]:= Reap[Sow@Fold[If[Element of the lst1 > thr && Element of the lst2, Sow@#; #2, # + #2] &, 0, lst1]][[2, 1]] for example.

EDIT 4 : You are right, it is not really clear. But the use of the Min@# > thr statement is working perfectly.

Old code (ugly and not smart at all):

sumP = 0;
resP = {};
sumU = 0;
resU = {};
For[i = 1, i < Length[list1 + 1, i++,
 sumP = sumP + list1[[i]];
 sumU = sumU + list2[[i]];
 If[sumP > 5 && sumU > 5 ,
  resP = Append[resP, sumP]; sumP = 0;
  resU = Append[resU, sumU]; sumU = 0;
  ];
 ]

NEW fast by Mr.Wizard :

   f6[lst_, thr_] := 
 Reap[Sow@Fold[If[Min@# > thr  , Sow@#1; #2, #1 + #2] &, 0, lst]][[2, 
   1]]

That ~40times faster. Thanks a lot.

Thread[{resP, resU}] == f6[Thread[{list1,list2}], 5] True
share|improve this question
    
Please add an example of the input and output needed with the {x,x} form. It is not clear to me what gets added. You can probably apply the threshold test with Min@# > thr. –  Mr.Wizard Oct 4 '12 at 11:05
    
Your suggestion Min@# > thr works. Again, thanks. –  toutsec Oct 4 '12 at 12:24
    
Glad I could help. :-) –  Mr.Wizard Oct 4 '12 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I recommend using Fold for this kind of operation, combined with either linked lists or Sow and Reap to accumulate results. Append is slow because lists in Mathematica are arrays and must be reallocated every time an element is appended.

Starting with:

lst = {2, 6, 4, 4, 1, 3, 1, 2, 4, 1, 2, 4, 0, 7, 4};

Here is the linked-list version:

Flatten @ Fold[If[Last@# > 5, {#, #2}, {First@#, Last@# + #2}] &, {{}, 0}, lst]
{8, 8, 7, 7, 11, 4}

This is what the output looks like before Flatten:

{{{{{{{}, 8}, 8}, 7}, 7}, 11}, 4}

Here is the method using Sow and Reap:

Reap[Sow @ Fold[If[# > 5, Sow@#; #2, # + #2] &, 0, lst]][[2, 1]]
{8, 8, 7, 7, 11, 4}

A similar method applied to other problems: (1) (2)

The Sow @ on the outside of Fold effectively appends the last element of the sequence which would otherwise be dropped by the algorithm.


Here are the methods packaged as functions, along with george's for easy comparison:

f1[lst_, thr_] := 
  Flatten @ Fold[If[Last@# > thr, {#, #2}, {First@#, Last@# + #2}] &, {{}, 0}, lst]

f2[lst_, thr_] := 
  Reap[Sow@Fold[If[# > thr, Sow@#; #2, # + #2] &, 0, lst]][[2, 1]]

george[t_, thresh_] := Module[{i = 0, s},
  Reap[While[i < Length[t], s = 0; 
     While[++i <= Length[t] && (s += t[[i]]) < thresh]; Sow[s]]][[2, 1]]
  ]

Timings:

big = RandomInteger[9, 500000];

george[big, 5] // Timing // First

1.279

f1[big, 5] // Timing // First

f2[big, 5] // Timing // First

0.593

0.468

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this clear answer. Unfortunately I have to additional treatement. See my edit for that. –  toutsec Oct 4 '12 at 9:38

Here is the obvious approach which is oh 300x faster.. Pretty isn't always best.

t = Random[Integer, 10] & /@ Range[2000];
threshold = 4;
Timing[
  i = 0; 
  t0 = Reap[
     While[i < Length[t], s = 0; 
     While[++i <= Length[t] && (s += t[[i]]) < threshold ]; 
     Sow[s]]][[2, 1]]][[1]]
Total[t] == Total[t0]
Timing[ t1 = 
   t //. {a___, b_ /; b < threshold, c_, d___} -> {a, b + c, d} ][[1]]
t1 == t0
share|improve this answer

I interpret your requirement as:

  • if an element in the list is less than the threshold value, add it to the next element in the list;
  • repeat this process until the list no longer changes.

So, for the threshold 5 and the input list {1,5,3,8,11,3,4} you'ld get

{6,3,8,11,3,4}
{6,11,11,3,4}
{6,11,11,7}

EDIT

I've now tested this solution to your problem ...

Implement the operation by using a replacement rule:

myList = {1,5,3,8,11,3,4}
threshold = 5
mylist = mylist //. {a___, b_ /; b < threshold, c_, d___} :> {a, b+c, d}

Note the use of ReplaceRepeated (symbolification //.).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh well thanks a lot! I will test tomorrow and tell you the result. I will have to handle lists of ~500 000 values (mostly composed of 0 or 1) : hope that it will not take forever. –  toutsec Oct 1 '12 at 19:32
    
Well, if your data series are mostly 0s and 1s why didn't you include that information in your question, there may well be a faster way of operating on such series. –  High Performance Mark Oct 1 '12 at 19:38
    
Because the distribution of the values are "random" : that means that I'll have mostly 0 and 1 but also 2,3 or even 4 and so on. I didn't know that was an important info, sorry of that. –  toutsec Oct 1 '12 at 19:43
    
I is working but it is slow. Any suggestion in order to be faster? –  toutsec Oct 2 '12 at 10:26
    
is "While" allowed? –  george Oct 2 '12 at 11:47

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