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So I have this array here:

t = [[8,2,22,97,38,15,0,40,0,75,4,5,7,78,52,12,50,77,91,8],
     [49,49,99,40,17,81,18,57,60,87,17,40,98,43,69,48,4,56,62,0],
     [81,49,31,73,55,79,14,29,93,71,40,67,53,88,30,3,49,13,36,65],
     [52,70,95,23,4,60,11,42,69,24,68,56,1,32,56,71,37,2,36,91],
     [22,31,16,71,51,67,63,89,41,92,36,54,22,40,40,28,66,33,13,80],
     [24,47,32,60,99,3,45,2,44,75,33,53,78,36,84,20,35,17,12,50],
     [32,98,81,28,64,23,67,10,26,38,40,67,59,54,70,66,18,38,64,70],
     [67,26,20,68,2,62,12,20,95,63,94,39,63,8,40,91,66,49,94,21],
     [24,55,58,5,66,73,99,26,97,17,78,78,96,83,14,88,34,89,63,72],
     [21,36,23,9,75,0,76,44,20,45,35,14,0,61,33,97,34,31,33,95],
     [78,17,53,28,22,75,31,67,15,94,3,80,4,62,16,14,9,53,56,92],
     [16,39,5,42,96,35,31,47,55,58,88,24,0,17,54,24,36,29,85,57],
     [86,56,0,48,35,71,89,7,5,44,44,37,44,60,21,58,51,54,17,58],
     [19,80,81,68,5,94,47,69,28,73,92,13,86,52,17,77,4,89,55,40],
     [4,52,8,83,97,35,99,16,7,97,57,32,16,26,26,79,33,27,98,66],
     [88,36,68,87,57,62,20,72,3,46,33,67,46,55,12,32,63,93,53,69],
     [4,42,16,73,38,25,39,11,24,94,72,18,8,46,29,32,40,62,76,36],
     [20,69,36,41,72,30,23,88,34,62,99,69,82,67,59,85,74,4,36,16],
     [20,73,35,29,78,31,90,1,74,31,49,71,48,86,81,16,23,57,5,54],
     [1,70,54,71,83,51,54,69,16,92,33,48,61,43,52,1,89,19,67,48]]

It's just a 2D list, what I need to do is find the four numbers diagonal to a number in any way.

I am getting the number using an xy co-ordinate and then getting the numbers around it, I thought this would be easy.

What I try to do is get the number and then find the 3 other numbers, I do this four times, for each direction

Here's the code I did to try and get it to work but it doesn't want to come out with correct numbers.

def getD(t,x,y):
    z = [[0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0]]
    xm = 1
    ym = 1
    for a in range(0,4):
        if a == 0:
            xm = 1
            ym = 1
        elif a == 1:
            xm = 1
            ym = -1
        elif a == 2:
            xm = -1
            ym = 1
        elif a == 3:
            xm = -1
            ym = -1
        for b in range(0,4):
            z[a][b]=t[y+(b*ym)][x+(b+xm)]
    print z

ym and xm is the direction that we want to move, so if xm is -1, go left, if 1 then go right, if ym is -1 then go down, else go up.

Anyone have any way of doing this?

If I do getD(t, 0, 0) then I get back [[2, 99, 73, 4], [2, 54, 29, 72], [8, 49, 49, 95], [8, 1, 73, 36]]

How would I emit ones that aren't valid? For example for when it is getD(t,0,0) and I only want the diagonal which is down and to the right because the others cant be right?


Heres a formatted version of the array

08 02 22 97 38 15 00 40 00 75 04 05 07 78 52 12 50 77 91 08
49 49 99 40 17 81 18 57 60 87 17 40 98 43 69 48 04 56 62 00
81 49 31 73 55 79 14 29 93 71 40 67 53 88 30 03 49 13 36 65
52 70 95 23 04 60 11 42 69 24 68 56 01 32 56 71 37 02 36 91
22 31 16 71 51 67 63 89 41 92 36 54 22 40 40 28 66 33 13 80
24 47 32 60 99 03 45 02 44 75 33 53 78 36 84 20 35 17 12 50
32 98 81 28 64 23 67 10 26 38 40 67 59 54 70 66 18 38 64 70
67 26 20 68 02 62 12 20 95 63 94 39 63 08 40 91 66 49 94 21
24 55 58 05 66 73 99 26 97 17 78 78 96 83 14 88 34 89 63 72
21 36 23 09 75 00 76 44 20 45 35 14 00 61 33 97 34 31 33 95
78 17 53 28 22 75 31 67 15 94 03 80 04 62 16 14 09 53 56 92
16 39 05 42 96 35 31 47 55 58 88 24 00 17 54 24 36 29 85 57
86 56 00 48 35 71 89 07 05 44 44 37 44 60 21 58 51 54 17 58
19 80 81 68 05 94 47 69 28 73 92 13 86 52 17 77 04 89 55 40
04 52 08 83 97 35 99 16 07 97 57 32 16 26 26 79 33 27 98 66
88 36 68 87 57 62 20 72 03 46 33 67 46 55 12 32 63 93 53 69
04 42 16 73 38 25 39 11 24 94 72 18 08 46 29 32 40 62 76 36
20 69 36 41 72 30 23 88 34 62 99 69 82 67 59 85 74 04 36 16
20 73 35 29 78 31 90 01 74 31 49 71 48 86 81 16 23 57 05 54
01 70 54 71 83 51 54 69 16 92 33 48 61 43 52 01 89 19 67 48

Say I wanted all the diagonals at (0,0) [the top corner] using getD(t,0,0)

Using the code above I would want something back along the lines of:

[[0, 0, 0, 0], [8, 49, 31, 23], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0]]

or if I wanted to get diagonals at point (19,19) [the last bottom corner] using getD(t, 19, 19)

Using the code above I would want something back along the lines of:

[[0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0], [48, 5, 4, 40]]
share|improve this question
1  
Please include an example with the results you expect to see. I'm having issues following what you want to get back. –  JerseyMike Oct 1 '12 at 15:15
    
Include a link to the problem you're talking about, or write it down for us. –  Jochen Ritzel Oct 1 '12 at 15:22
    
There we go. I tried to explain, must not have said it clearly enough sorry. –  FabianCook Oct 1 '12 at 15:23
    
i don't understand what b is for –  njzk2 Oct 1 '12 at 15:39
1  
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you probably want something like

def get_diagonal(t, x, y, length=4):
    rays = []
    diagonal_directions = [(1,1),(1,-1),(-1,1),(-1,-1)]
    for dx, dy in diagonal_directions:
        if not ((0 <= (x+dx*(length-1)) < len(t[0])) and
                (0 <= (y+dy*(length-1)) < len(t))):
            ray = []
        else:
            ray = [t[y+dy*i][x+dx*i] for i in range(length)]
        rays.append(ray)
    return rays

[Better: remove rays entirely and simply yield each ray.]

I always mix up x and y when doing this stuff, so you'll want to check that, but I think something like this should work. Example:

In [48]: get_diagonal(t, 0, 0)
Out[48]: [[8, 49, 31, 23], [], [], []]

In [49]: get_diagonal(t, 19, 19)
Out[49]: [[], [], [], [48, 5, 4, 40]]

In [50]: get_diagonal(t, 5, 5)
Out[50]: [[3, 67, 20, 97], [3, 63, 42, 93], [3, 64, 68, 58], [3, 51, 23, 31]]

In [51]: get_diagonal(t, 5, 5, 3)
Out[51]: [[3, 67, 20], [3, 63, 42], [3, 64, 68], [3, 51, 23]]

You can change the order of diagonal_directions to match your expectations. Also, note that I'm returning [] instead of [0,0,0,0] if you don't have enough terms. Returning [0,0,0,0] is a bad idea, ISTM -- how would you distinguish between not having enough terms and having the right number of terms but they're all zero? It feels weird to me to load that logic into the diagonal function, but you could easily change that.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome man! I think I was on the right track but not quite there. –  FabianCook Oct 1 '12 at 15:38
    
Now for the rest of the problem. xD. Wouldn't happen to have any code to do up, down, left and right would you? In the same format... –  FabianCook Oct 1 '12 at 15:39
    
@SmartLemon: I'll leave that to you. If you understand what dx and dy mean, you should be able to figure out how you can use the same approach to get those directions to work -- or how to get a knight's step to work, for that matter. –  DSM Oct 1 '12 at 15:41
    
Okies. I'll take a crack at it. –  FabianCook Oct 1 '12 at 15:41
    
Well I will when I wake up xD. Its 4.43 am in the morning at the mo so yeah xD –  FabianCook Oct 1 '12 at 15:43
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Euler problem 11 is really easy with Numpy:

First, create your Numpy matrix:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> LoL=np.array([map(int,ss.split()) for ss in """\
... 08 02 22 97 38 15 00 40 00 75 04 05 07 78 52 12 50 77 91 08
... 49 49 99 40 17 81 18 57 60 87 17 40 98 43 69 48 04 56 62 00
... 81 49 31 73 55 79 14 29 93 71 40 67 53 88 30 03 49 13 36 65
... 52 70 95 23 04 60 11 42 69 24 68 56 01 32 56 71 37 02 36 91
... 22 31 16 71 51 67 63 89 41 92 36 54 22 40 40 28 66 33 13 80
... 24 47 32 60 99 03 45 02 44 75 33 53 78 36 84 20 35 17 12 50
... 32 98 81 28 64 23 67 10 26 38 40 67 59 54 70 66 18 38 64 70
... 67 26 20 68 02 62 12 20 95 63 94 39 63 08 40 91 66 49 94 21
... 24 55 58 05 66 73 99 26 97 17 78 78 96 83 14 88 34 89 63 72
... 21 36 23 09 75 00 76 44 20 45 35 14 00 61 33 97 34 31 33 95
... 78 17 53 28 22 75 31 67 15 94 03 80 04 62 16 14 09 53 56 92
... 16 39 05 42 96 35 31 47 55 58 88 24 00 17 54 24 36 29 85 57
... 86 56 00 48 35 71 89 07 05 44 44 37 44 60 21 58 51 54 17 58
... 19 80 81 68 05 94 47 69 28 73 92 13 86 52 17 77 04 89 55 40
... 04 52 08 83 97 35 99 16 07 97 57 32 16 26 26 79 33 27 98 66
... 88 36 68 87 57 62 20 72 03 46 33 67 46 55 12 32 63 93 53 69
... 04 42 16 73 38 25 39 11 24 94 72 18 08 46 29 32 40 62 76 36
... 20 69 36 41 72 30 23 88 34 62 99 69 82 67 59 85 74 04 36 16
... 20 73 35 29 78 31 90 01 74 31 49 71 48 86 81 16 23 57 05 54
... 01 70 54 71 83 51 54 69 16 92 33 48 61 43 52 01 89 19 67 48\
... """.splitlines()])

Now, you can treat each 225 of the 4x4 matrixes as its own easy piece:

def maxOfSub4x4(a):
    l=[]
    for i in range(4):             # each line of 4x4 square
        l.append(a[i])
        l.append(a[:,i])

    l.append(a.diagonal())
    l.append(a[::-1].diagonal())   # opposite diagonal
    print l

    return max([reduce(int.__mul__,[int(i) for i in e]) for e in l])    

Now the max of the particular square at LoL[0:4,0,4] can be seen:

    print maxOfSub4x4(LoL[0:4,0:4])

Prints the elements of the 4x4 sub array, including the two diagonals, and the max product of those array elements:

[array([ 8,  2, 22, 97]), array([ 8, 49, 81, 52]), array([49, 49, 99, 40]), array([ 2, 49, 49, 70]), array([81, 49, 31, 73]), array([22, 99, 31, 95]), array([52, 70, 95, 23]), array([97, 40, 73, 23]), array([ 8, 49, 31, 23]), array([52, 49, 99, 97])]
24468444

Now, just iterate over all 225 4x4 sub arrays in the 20 x 20 full array -- done.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont wan't to know the answer, the purpose of the project is to get people thinking. –  FabianCook Oct 2 '12 at 0:24
    
OK -- key line edited out. You will still need to think to solve... –  the wolf Oct 2 '12 at 2:41
    
I got the right answer with my code. :) –  FabianCook Oct 2 '12 at 5:49
    
Good! Just 385 to go... –  the wolf Oct 2 '12 at 6:27
    
Done I think 15 of em –  FabianCook Oct 2 '12 at 6:30
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