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I know there are answers for this question using using gcc byteswap and other alternatives on the web but was wondering why my code below isn't working.

Firstly I have gcc warnings ( which I feel shouldn't be coming ) and reason why I don't want to use byteswap is because I need to determine if my machine is big endian or little endian and use byteswap accordingly i.,e if my machine is big endian I could memcpy the bytes as is without any translation otherwise I need to swap them and copy it.

static inline uint64_t ntohl_64(uint64_t val)
{
    unsigned char *pp =(unsigned char *)&val;
    uint64_t val2 = ( pp[0] << 56  | pp[1] << 48 
                    | pp[2] << 40  | pp[3] << 32 
                    | pp[4] << 24 | pp[5] << 16
                    | pp[6] << 8 | pp[7]);
    return val2;
}

int main()

{
    int64_t a=0xFFFF0000;
    int64_t b=__const__byteswap64(a);
    int64_t c=ntohl_64(a);
    printf("\n %lld[%x] [%lld] [%lld]\n ", a, a, b, c);
} 

 Warnings:-
 In function \u2018uint64_t ntohl_64(uint64_t)\u2019:
     warning: left shift count >= width of type
     warning: left shift count >= width of type
     warning: left shift count >= width of type
     warning: left shift count >= width of type


 Output:-
 4294901760[00000000ffff0000] 281470681743360[0000ffff00000000] 65535[000000000000ffff]

I am running this on a little endian machine so byteswap and ntohl_64 should result in exact same values but unfortunately I get completely unexpected results. It would be great if someone can pointout whats wrong.

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3  
Have you considered resolving the warnings? –  PlasmaHH Oct 1 '12 at 15:11
    
Hi, I amn't sure why there are warnings in the first place as my shift exactly fits 64 bit int and there should be no loss –  Shanky Oct 1 '12 at 15:14
1  
Have you checked what type it is that you are shifting? –  PlasmaHH Oct 1 '12 at 15:17
1  
What PlasmaHH is vaguely trying to tell you is that you're shifting uint8_t's which aren't going to up convert just by shifting (you would need to cast them to uint64_t first). –  CrazyCasta Oct 1 '12 at 15:24
    
cool. casting and shifting does the work. But wondering why doesn't it throw warnings and work correctly for 32 bit types. i.,e uint32_t val2 = pp[0] << 24 | pp[1] << 16 | pp[2] << 8 | pp[3]; this just fine –  Shanky Oct 1 '12 at 15:30

4 Answers 4

The reason your code does not work is because you're shifting unsigned chars. As they shift the bits fall off the top and any shift greater than 7 can be though of as returning 0 (though some implementations end up with weird results due to the way the machine code shifts work, x86 is an example). You have to cast them to whatever you want the final size to be first like:

((uint64_t)pp[0]) << 56

Your optimal solution with gcc would be to use htobe64. This function does everything for you.

P.S. It's a little bit off topic, but if you want to make the function portable across endianness you could do:

Edit based on Nova Denizen's comment:

static inline uint64_t htonl_64(uint64_t val)
{
    union{
        uint64_t retVal;
        uint8_t bytes[8];
    };

    bytes[0] = (val & 0x00000000000000ff);
    bytes[1] = (val & 0x000000000000ff00) >> 8;
    bytes[2] = (val & 0x0000000000ff0000) >> 16;
    bytes[3] = (val & 0x00000000ff000000) >> 24;
    bytes[4] = (val & 0x000000ff00000000) >> 32;
    bytes[5] = (val & 0x0000ff0000000000) >> 40;
    bytes[6] = (val & 0x00ff000000000000) >> 48;
    bytes[7] = (val & 0xff00000000000000) >> 56;

    return retVal;
}

static inline uint64_t ntohl_64(uint64_t val)
{
    union{
        uint64_t inVal;
        uint8_t bytes[8];
    };

    inVal = val;

    return bytes[0] |
        ((uint64_t)bytes[1]) <<  8 |
        ((uint64_t)bytes[2]) << 16 |
        ((uint64_t)bytes[3]) << 24 |
        ((uint64_t)bytes[4]) << 32 |
        ((uint64_t)bytes[5]) << 40 |
        ((uint64_t)bytes[6]) << 48 |
        ((uint64_t)bytes[7]) << 56;
}

Assuming the compiler doesn't do something to the uint64_t on it's way back through the return, and assuming the user treats the result as an 8-byte value (and not an integer), that code should work on any system. With any luck, your compiler will be able to optimize out the whole expression if you're on a big endian system and use some builtin byte swapping technique if you're on a little endian machine (and it's guaranteed to still work on any other kind of machine).

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This code depends on the assumption that all systems are plain vanilla big-endian or little-endian, and this is not a good assumption to make if portability is a concern. See Rob Pike's The Byte Order Fallacy. –  NovaDenizen Oct 1 '12 at 15:41
    
@NovaDenizen Nothing that I can find in that blog post suggests the existence of a non big/little-endian machine. While you are correct that it is nice to handle the case of a hypothetical machine, nothing you have provided suggests that such a machine exists. –  CrazyCasta Oct 1 '12 at 19:35
    
Agreed. That's the difference between programming to the standard and just saying "it works on these machines". –  NovaDenizen Oct 3 '12 at 1:39
    
I wasn't agreeing with you, I was disagreeing. You're suggesting that we handle the case of a machine that doesn't exist. I could just as well define a machine where the code in my answer doesn't work, there is no one answer that will work on any machine that uses the paradigm used by the ntoh/hton functions. –  CrazyCasta Oct 3 '12 at 3:24
uint64_t val2 = ( pp[0] << 56  | pp[1] << 48 
                | pp[2] << 40  | pp[3] << 32 
                | pp[4] << 24 | pp[5] << 16
                | pp[6] << 8 | pp[7]);

pp[0] is an unsigned char and 56 is an int, so pp[0] << 56 performs the left-shift as an unsigned char, with an unsigned char result. This isn't what you want, because you want all these shifts to have type unsigned long long.

The way to fix this is to cast, like ((unsigned long long)pp[0]) << 56.

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The shifted value does not get promoted based on the type of the shifting value. As an example, the following code prints out the value 1 with gcc. uint8_t x = 1; uint64_t c32 = 32, y; y = x << c32; printf("%llu", y); –  CrazyCasta Oct 1 '12 at 19:52

Since pp[x] is 8-bit wide, the expression pp[0] << 56 results in zero. You need explicit masking on the original value and then shifting:

uint64_t val2 = (( val & 0xff ) << 56 ) |
                (( val & 0xff00 ) << 48 ) |
                ...

In any case, just use compiler built-ins, they usually result in a single byte-swapping instruction.

share|improve this answer
    
well I don't have to always swap. In case the machine is big endian I could use the value as is and the function above if works would give the same result. I think if I use the way you suggested I will always end up swapping. –  Shanky Oct 1 '12 at 15:23
    
Don't do this at run time, it's a waste. Figure out what platform you are building for and use macros/templates/whatever. Very few architectures could flip between BE and LE. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Oct 1 '12 at 15:37
2  
Yes, the problem is that the right hand operand to the shift operators are larger than the width of the type they're operating on, as the compiler indicates with the "shift count >= width of type" warnings. This results in undefined behavior (not necessarily zero). Also it's important to know that integer promotion is performed on the operands to <<, so char a = 1; a << 24; works fine but a << 48; doesn't (assuming an int width of 32 bits). –  bames53 Oct 1 '12 at 15:39

Casting and shifting works as PlasmaHH suggesting but I don't know why 32 bit shifts upconvert automatically and not 64 bit.

typedef uint64_t __u64;

static inline uint64_t ntohl_64(uint64_t val)
{
unsigned char *pp =(unsigned char *)&val;
return ((__u64)pp[0] << 56 |
        (__u64)pp[1] << 48 | 
        (__u64)pp[2] << 40 |
        (__u64)pp[3] << 32 | 
        (__u64)pp[4] << 24 | 
        (__u64)pp[5] << 16 |
        (__u64)pp[6] << 8  |   
        (__u64)pp[7]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The numeric literals have type int, and binary operators promote the "lower" of distinct argument types to the "upper". So each pp[0] gets promoted to an int. –  NovaDenizen Oct 1 '12 at 15:45
    
@NovaDenizen It's correct that both operands are converted to the larger of the two types, but integer promotion has a step before that which converts types smaller than int up to int. So char(5) << char(15) has well defined behavior even though both sides are only char and 15 is larger than the width of char. –  bames53 Oct 1 '12 at 16:06

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