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I have a List<KeyValuePair<string, othertype>>. I need to do something along the lines of

list.Find(x=>x.Key=="foobar")

However, if that doesn't exist in the list, what will the behavior be? Usually it would return null, but structs can't be null.

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2  
Try it with int and see what happens. –  Oded Oct 1 '12 at 15:25
2  
The default value for type T, more specifically default(T). –  João Angelo Oct 1 '12 at 15:25
    
If you want Find to return null when no match is found, consider using Tuple instead of KeyValuePair. –  JamieSee Oct 1 '12 at 15:44
    
@JamieSee Can't use Tuples because we are aiming for .Net 2.0 compatibility –  Earlz Oct 1 '12 at 15:53
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It will return the default(T) which will be the same as new KeyValuePair<string, othertype>>(), that is, a default initialized struct.

Basically, the default for reference types is always null, and for value types (including struct) it's the default (0 for numerics, false for bool, a struct with every field defaulted for structures, etc.)

So, for a default(KeyValuePair<string, othertype>>) you'd get back a KVP where the Key was null (default for string) and whatever the default(othertype) would be (as in the examples above)...

From the MSDN:

The first element that matches the conditions defined by the specified predicate, if found; otherwise, the default value for type T.

Using this, if you wanted to check and see if you got back the default, I'd recommend checking for yourResult.Key != null to see if you got a result, or you could use a different Find method such as FindIndex as Olivier suggests.

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It may be worth noting that for the particular value type Nullable<T>, because the default initialization results in HasValue being false (as would be any Boolean field of any structure), it causes the structure to be interpreted in many contexts as a null value. –  supercat Oct 17 '12 at 14:55
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My advice is to use FindIndex for non nullable types

int index = list.FindIndex(x => x.Key=="foobar");
if (index >= 0) {
    // found!
    UseResult(list[index]);
}

The default value default(T) is returned if Find() is not successful. For non nullable types, this result cannot be distinguished from regular entries having the default value. This is also true for nullable types when the list might contain null entries.

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+1: this is the better solution. In this case, a key-value pair with a null key is unlikely to be a legitimate value, but it is possible. Far too many people forget this, or that, for example, a List<string> can contain null values. –  phoog Oct 1 '12 at 16:08
    
+1: Very nice. I didn't want to compare against a default; like you said, in most cases, there's no way to determine the difference. –  Lynn Crumbling Sep 11 '13 at 19:57
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By reading these two documentation articles, it sounds to me as though you should be returned the default value for your struct:

Default Values: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa664475(v=vs.71).aspx

List(T).Find Method: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x0b5b5bc.aspx

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Structure is a value type. so, In case of structure Find will return default value of structure.

EXAMPLE:

Lets say we have structure as below,

public struct Test
{
   public int i;
}

List<Test> list = new List<test>() { new Test { i = 1 } };
Test result = list.Find(o => o.i == 2);

In above Find result value like new Test(). you can compare value by below code.

if (resul.Equals(new Test()))
{

        //Do something
 }
 else
 {
                  //Do something    
 }

OR

if (resul.Equals(default(Test)))
{

        //Do something
 }
 else
 {
                  //Do something    
 }
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Heh, that if condition looks so... wrong. That would never ever work for reference types :) structs are definitely not something I use everyday though –  Earlz Oct 1 '12 at 15:34
    
I changed '==' to Equals. –  Jignesh Thakker Oct 1 '12 at 15:35
    
I'd recommend against doing a == new Test(), that's a bit heavy since == on struct is reflective. I'd instead recommend checking the Key field for null in the OP example. –  James Michael Hare Oct 1 '12 at 15:35
    
Yes we can check Key field for null. But I think if key type is int then default value for int is 0. so, if we don't want to go with data type then checking with new Test() will be useful. –  Jignesh Thakker Oct 1 '12 at 15:38
    
Even in those cases, I'd check default(Test) rather than == new Test(), intention is more clear. –  James Michael Hare Oct 1 '12 at 15:51
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