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I would like to know, if it is possible, how to generate a compiler warning based on how a function's returned value's typecasting corresponds to one of the passed parameters. In my example, I would like to generated a compiler warning if the function call is type-casted to anything less than what is defined by the "Bytes" parameter. This is used in a C program using IAR for the MSP430

For Example:

(INT16U)GetINTU(VarPtr, 2); // This is ok
(INT16U)GetINTU(VarPtr, 4); // generates warning
(INT32U)GetINTU(VarPtr, 4); // This is ok
(INT32U)GetINTU(VarPtr, 8); // generates warning
(INT64U)GetINTU(VarPtr, 4); // This is ok

Here is the said function:

INT64U GetINTU(INT8U* Address, INT8U Bytes)
{
INT64U Value = 0;
if(Bytes<=8)
    {
    do
        {
        Value += ((INT64U)(*Address++))<<(--Bytes<<3);  
        }while(Bytes);
    }
return Value;
}

EDIT: I also considered returning a null pointer but that means I need a static variable. which I do not want to do

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's one simple answer to this: You can't. The reason being that you can't tell what the return value will be typecasted to after the function returns.

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I want the error to be at compile time. I would like it to compare the cast and the value of "Bytes" "Bytes" will always be passed hard coded numbers. 1, 2, 4, 8, and will never be a variable. This is why I figured there might be a way to do this. –  Jeremy Oct 1 '12 at 15:46
1  
@Jeremy It would be possible with C++ using templates. Alas, not in plain C, not even using macros then. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 1 '12 at 15:51
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No, that is not possible. The compiler is not smart enough to determine the output value at compile time. One thing you could do would be to offer multiple functions with different return types and do asserts inside them (which would catch problems at runtime). Of course, in an embedded environment this kind of code duplication would be bad.

Probably the best solution would be to do:

#define GetINT8U(addr, bytes) assert(bytes <= 1), (INT8U)GetINTU(addr, bytes)
#define GetINT16U(addr, bytes) assert(bytes <= 2), (INT16U)GetINTU(addr, bytes)
#define GetINT32U(addr, bytes) assert(bytes <= 4), (INT32U)GetINTU(addr, bytes)
#define GetINT64U(addr, bytes) assert(bytes <= 8), (INT64U)GetINTU(addr, bytes)
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I want the error to be at compile time. I would like it to compare the cast and the value of "Bytes" "Bytes" will always be passed hard coded numbers. 1, 2, 4, 8, and will never be a variable. This is why I figured there might be a way to do this. –  Jeremy Oct 1 '12 at 15:46
    
@Jeremy I'm not aware of a way of doing that in C. Perhaps there's some weird way of doing it with ifdefs inside the defines, though I'm not aware of what this way would be. You would somehow put a #if bytes > 1 #error #endif inside the #define. Not sure how or even if it's possible. –  CrazyCasta Oct 1 '12 at 19:40
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You can generate custom warnings or errors with #warning and #error but its compile time. So you cant apply this to runtime code.

Here is more explanation. http://mobiledevelopertips.com/c/using-error-and-warning-compiler-directives.html

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