Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to better understand the effects JavaScript closures have on memory:

function fee(arg){

  function figh(){
    //some code
     fum(passOnSomeARG)
  }     

  function fo(y){
    //some calculations with y
  }

  function fum(x){
    //some code
     fo(x)
  }

  figh()
}

In the above example are the inner functions re-read into memory every time "fee()" is called? if so is this efficient? If not then what is happening?

side note: fee() may be called a lot of times in succession (either a loop or a mouse event onmousemove)

share|improve this question
    
If you're asking if those inner functions will be created every time fee is invoked, then yes, although I'd guess that implementations have optimizations to help with this. And since your inner functions are not stored beyond the lifetime of the fee invocation, they'll be garbage collected. Still @Kolink's answer shows a good alternative. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 1 '12 at 17:41
1  
You have inner functions here, but no closure is formed as there is no external reference to any of the inner functions. In Kolink's code below, the outer (self-executing) function forms a closure as the statement window.fee = function(...){...} creates an external reference to an internal (anonymous) function. The golden rule to remember here is that a closure is only formed if an enduring external reference exists to an inner function. Inner functions do not, in themselves, lead to the formation of a closure. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Oct 6 '12 at 6:38
    
@Beetroot-Beetroot so that means with an external reference it keeps the inner functions from being garbage collected which keeps them from being recreated? –  zero Oct 6 '12 at 14:07
2  
Not quite. If the outer function were called again, then new instances of the the inner functions would be created - and sometimes this is what's required. When an external reference to at least one inner function exists, then a closure is formed and calling an inner function via its external reference affords it access to the other inner members (functions in this case) that existed at the time the closure was formed. It's the nature of a closure that whole of the outer environment is preserved, but it is only accessible to those inner function(s) to which external reference(s) exist. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Oct 6 '12 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think so, yes. It would be more efficient to do this:

(function() {
    var figh = function() {
        // some code
        fum(passOnSomeARG);
    };
    var fo = function(y) {
        // some calculations with y
    };
    var fum = function(x) {
        // some code
        fo(x);
    };
    window.fee = function(arg) {
        figh();
    };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
+1, except for your invalid function/variable hybrid syntax. ;) –  I Hate Lazy Oct 1 '12 at 17:42
    
@user1689607 : what exactly is invalid there? –  c-smile Oct 1 '12 at 17:56
    
@c-smile: See the revision history. It has been since corrected. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 1 '12 at 17:58
2  
A closure is helpful in certain particular cases, like function currying. It can have negative performance characteristics, though, especially if it is done many times (like in a loop). Don't use it if you don't need it. –  benekastah Oct 2 '12 at 17:20
1  
It's probably worth noting that the formation of closures in a loop is very useful, even necessary, in order to make loop-dependent values accessible (to an inner function) after the loop has completed. On execution of correctly constructed code, such closures will each contain members reflecting the value of loop-dependent variable(s) at the iteration when they were formed. The cost of doing this is the consumption of working memory (RAM), not performance per se. Approached correctly, this cost need not be great. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Oct 6 '12 at 6:54

Consider this code:

function foo(){
  function local(){ ... local code ... }     
  local();
}

Under the hood JS VM translates body of the foo() to this sequence (pseudo-code):

var local = new Function({bytecode: local code});
local();

So each time you call the foo new instance of a function is allocated. Usually function instance is relatively small object no matter how large its body is. But still - allocation happens and heap manager will be busy to collect garbage left after each foo() call.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.