Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm finding it difficult to understand how the Ackermann Function works. I think my understanding of recursion is flawed?

Here is the code in Python:

  def naive_ackermann(m, n):
    global calls
    calls += 1
    if m == 0:
        return n + 1
    elif n == 0:
        return naive_ackermann(m - 1, 1)
    else:
        return naive_ackermann(m - 1, naive_ackermann(m, n - 1))

If I do the function call of naive_ackermann(3,4), how and why do I end up getting 125?

Comments will be appreciated.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
What should be output on Paper?? –  Rohit Jain Oct 1 '12 at 17:33
1  
according to wikipedia 125 is the right answer... –  Joran Beasley Oct 1 '12 at 17:38
    
I don't understand how the function works. –  Hummus Oct 1 '12 at 17:39
3  
@S'Koder'Karwa. The best way to understand is to take a paper and pencil.. Take two values suppose (2, 3).. And follow the steps of the algorithm. You will come to know how that ends.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 1 '12 at 17:49
1  
Take a look here too, although with A(3,4) you'd have to sit for quite a long while for the animation: gfredericks.com/sandbox/arith/ackermann –  Abhranil Das Oct 1 '12 at 17:54
show 4 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The computation of A(3,4) is not as easy or short as it might appear at first from the small values of the arguments. The complexity (# of iteration steps) of the Ackermann function grows very rapidly with its arguments, as does the computed result.

Here is the definition of the Ackermann function from Wikipedia:

enter image description here

As you can see, at every iteration, the value of m decreases until it reaches 0 in what will be the last step, at which point the final value of n (+1) gives you the answer. So for the answer, you only need to trace how n changes as you go through the recursive iterations. For why the Ackermann function grows so rapidly, you can take a look at this subsection of the wiki.

As Joran Beasley has already mentioned, A(3,4) is indeed 125, as written in Wikipedia. However, the process to get to this result is not very short. In fact, as I found out, it is required to compute by recursion 315 Ackermann function values to get A(3,4), the number of iterations required being roughly proportional to that.

If you still wish to visualize how this result is arrived at, you can take a look at this page, which animates the calculation of every recursion step. Be warned, though, that A(3,4) will take forever to finish animating here, but at least you might get some idea of the process with smaller arguments.

share|improve this answer
1  
good answer ;) ... –  Joran Beasley Oct 1 '12 at 18:21
add comment

Here is a Java implementation:

/*
 * To change this template, choose Tools | Templates
 * and open the template in the editor.
 */

package ackerman;
import java.util.Vector;

    /**
     *
     * @author LajosArpad
     */

    public class Main {
        public static String status = "ackerman(3, 4)";
    public static int ackerman(int m, int n)
    {
        String temp = status.substring(status.lastIndexOf("ackerman"));
        while (temp.indexOf("))") >= 0)
        {
            temp = temp.substring(0, temp.length() - 2);
        }
        boolean foo = status.indexOf(")") == status.lastIndexOf(")");
        String t1 = foo ? "" : status.substring(0, status.lastIndexOf("ackerman") - 1);
        String t2 = foo ? "" : status.substring(status.lastIndexOf("ackerman"));
        if (t2.length() > 0)
        {
            t2 = t2.substring(t2.indexOf(")") + 1);
        }
        if (m == 0)
        {
            status = t1 + (n + 1) + t2;
            System.out.println(" = " + status);
            return n + 1;
        }
        else if (n == 0)
        {
            status = t1 + "ackerman(" + (m - 1) + ", 1)" + t2;
            System.out.println(" = " + status);
            return ackerman(m - 1, 1);
        }
        else
        {
            status = t1 + " ackerman(" + (m - 1) + ", ackerman(" + m + ", " + (n - 1) + "))" + t2;
            System.out.println(" = " + status);
            return ackerman(m - 1, ackerman(m, n - 1));
        }
    }

        /**
         * @param args the command line arguments
         */
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            System.out.println(Main.ackerman(3, 4));
            // TODO code application logic here
        }

    }

Just run this code and you will know how ackerman works. I'm not fluent in Python, but I hope that's not a problem.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's a version that prints an explanation:

def A(m, n, s="%s"):
    print s % ("A(%d,%d)" % (m, n))
    if m == 0:
        return n + 1
    if n == 0:
        return A(m - 1, 1, s)
    n2 = A(m, n - 1, s % ("A(%d,%%s)" % (m - 1)))
    return A(m - 1, n2, s)

print A(2,2)

With arguments 2,2 the output is this. (With 3,4 it becomes already a bit too much)

A(2,2)
A(1,A(2,1))
A(1,A(1,A(2,0)))
A(1,A(1,A(1,1)))
A(1,A(1,A(0,A(1,0))))
A(1,A(1,A(0,A(0,1))))
A(1,A(1,A(0,2)))
A(1,A(1,3))
A(1,A(0,A(1,2)))
A(1,A(0,A(0,A(1,1))))
A(1,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(1,0)))))
A(1,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,1)))))
A(1,A(0,A(0,A(0,2))))
A(1,A(0,A(0,3)))
A(1,A(0,4))
A(1,5)
A(0,A(1,4))
A(0,A(0,A(1,3)))
A(0,A(0,A(0,A(1,2))))
A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(1,1)))))
A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(1,0))))))
A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,1))))))
A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,2)))))
A(0,A(0,A(0,A(0,3))))
A(0,A(0,A(0,4)))
A(0,A(0,5))
A(0,6)
7
share|improve this answer
    
good answers all over the place –  Joran Beasley Oct 1 '12 at 18:31
add comment
ackerman(3,4) 

=ackerman(2,ackerman(3,3)) = ackerman(2,61)    #ackerman(3,3) = 61 ...
=ackerman(1,ackerman(2,60)) = ackerman (1,123)  #ackerman(2,60) = 123...
=ackerman(0,ackerman(1,122)) = ackerman (0,124)  #ackerman(1,122) = 124...
= 124+1 = 125

see http://goo.gl/jDDEA here to visualize ackerman(2,3) ( It was too long to visualize 3,4)

share|improve this answer
    
How do you get ackerman(2,61) from ackerman(2,ackerman(3,3))? Where did the 61 come from? –  Hummus Oct 1 '12 at 17:52
    
You're incorrect. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ackermann_function –  Maksym Polshcha Oct 1 '12 at 17:56
    
ackerman(3,3) = 61 so ackerman(2,ackerman(3,3)) = ackerman(2,61) @MaksymPolshcha how is it wrong ... I looked at that wikipedia entry and all my numbers add up... –  Joran Beasley Oct 1 '12 at 18:05
    
why -1? who put that? please explain –  Joran Beasley Oct 1 '12 at 18:08
add comment

Here is a very good description what it is, what it is for and its place in computability theory http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ackermann_function

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.