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I'm translating a library written in C++ to C#, and the keyword 'union' exists once. In a struct.

What's the correct way of translating it into C#? And what does it do? It looks something like this;

struct Foo {
    float bar;

    union {
        int killroy;
        float fubar;
    } as;
}
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It might be safer but when you're interacting with C libraries that provide these sorts of data structures this decision in C# breaks even the rudimentary encapsulation of your C/C++ structures. I'm trying to deal with something like this: struct LibrarySType { AnotherType *anotherTypeBuff; int oneSetOfFlags; int anotherSetOfFlags; union { struct { int structMember1; ... } oneUseOfThisLibraryType; struct { char *structMember2; ... } anotherUseOfThisLibraryType; ... } u; int64 *moreStuff; ... you get the idea } Now I didn't invent this clever data structure, but it's part of a vendor API I need –  Steve Wart Oct 19 '10 at 18:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 43 down vote accepted

You can use explicit field layouts for that:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)] 
public struct SampleUnion
{
    [FieldOffset(0)] public float bar;
    [FieldOffset(4)] public int killroy;
    [FieldOffset(4)] public float fubar;
}

Untested. The idea is that two variables have the same position in your struct. You can of course only use one of them.

More informations about unions in struct tutorial

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Note that this will work only if the types involved are primitive types (like int and float). Once objects are involved, it won't let you. –  Khoth Sep 24 '08 at 12:40
5  
Does it work with value types (like enum) or just primitive types? –  Taylor Leese Jul 24 '09 at 18:53
    
If you have other complex types, the second one could be a property that converts to/from the other. Depends on the usage of the Union and how it is used in other code you are porting. –  AaronLS Nov 12 '12 at 5:47

You can't really decide how to deal with this without knowing something about how it is used. If it is merely being used to save space, then you can ignore it and just use a struct.

However that is not usually why unions are used. There two common reasons to use them. One is to provide 2 or more ways to access the same data. For instance, a union of an int and an array of 4 bytes is one (of many) ways to separate out the bytes of a 32 bit integer.

The other is when the data in the struct came from an external source such as a network data packet. Usually one element of the struct enclosing the union is an ID that tells you which flavor of the union is in effect.

In neither of these cases can you blindly ignore the union and convert it to a struct where the two (or more) fields do not coincide.

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1  
What I think is important in Steve's answer, is you really need to understand the usage of the particular union you are porting. There may be other constructs in C# that will meet the needs in a more elegant way. –  AaronLS Nov 12 '12 at 5:48
    
+1 for the typical usages –  mbx Nov 22 '12 at 8:50

Personally, I would ignore the UNION all together and implement Killroy and Fubar as separate fields

public struct Foo
{
    float bar;
    int Kilroy;
    float Fubar;
}

Using a UNION saves 32 bits of memory allocated by the int....not going to make or break an app these days.

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5  
this might not work depending on how it is accessed by other parts of the library, in some instances you can write to one instance and read from the other to get the same data but in a slightly different format, that functionality will be broken if you split it into two distinct variables –  KPexEA Sep 24 '08 at 20:51
    
@KPexEA I agree. However, if on the other hand, it is the type of union where some flag indicates which of the two fields is the appropriate one, then this will work fine. I think what is really important is to understand the usage and purpose of the union in each case, before deciding how to port it. –  AaronLS Nov 12 '12 at 5:53

In C/C++ union is used to overlay different members in the same memory location, so if you have a union of an int and a flat they both use the same 4 bytes of memory, obviously writing to one corrupts the other (since int and float have different bit layout).

In .net MS went with the safer choice and didn't include this feature.

EDIT: except for interop

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that could be because .NET is higher-level and you probably don't have to worry about explicitly serializing data and transferring between little-endian and big-endian machines. Unions provide a nice way to convert, using the trick a previous comment noted. –  tloach Sep 24 '08 at 15:41

Here is a tentative to hold several complex messages (simplified here) in an Union. Messages are mutually exclusive, we have only one of them available at a time, possibly none. I address here the conceptual form of union, not the technical (binary) one which is addressed by other posts in this page.

   public class Msg1 {
      public int v;
   }

   public class Msg2 {
      public double v;
   }

   public class Msg3 {
      public string v;
   }

   public class Union {

      public enum selector_t {
         NONE,
         MSG1,
         MSG2,
         MSG3,
      }

      private selector_t _selector;
      private Object     _value;

      public Union() {
         reset();
      }

      public Union( Msg1 value ) {
         set( value );
      }

      public Union( Msg2 value ) {
         set( value );
      }

      public Union( Msg3 value ) {
         set( value );
      }

      private void set( selector_t selector, Object value ) {
         _selector = selector;
         _value    = value;
      }

      public selector_t getSelector() {
         return _selector;
      }

      public bool isNone() {
         return _selector == selector_t.NONE;
      }

      public bool isMsg1() {
         return _selector == selector_t.MSG1;
      }

      public bool isMsg2() {
         return _selector == selector_t.MSG2;
      }

      public bool isMsg3() {
         return _selector == selector_t.MSG3;
      }

      public void reset() {
         set( selector_t.NONE, null );
      }

      public void set( Msg1 value ) {
         set( selector_t.MSG1, value );
      }

      public void set( Msg2 value ) {
         set( selector_t.MSG2, value );
      }

      public void set( Msg3 value ) {
         set( selector_t.MSG3, value );
      }

      public Msg1 getMsg1() {
         return (Msg1)_value;
      }

      public Msg2 getMsg2() {
         return (Msg2)_value;
      }

      public Msg3 getMsg3() {
         return (Msg3)_value;
      }
   }

   class Program {
      static void Main(string[] args) {
         Union u = new Union( new Msg2());
         Console.WriteLine( "isMsg1: " + u.isMsg1());
         Console.WriteLine( "isMsg2: " + u.isMsg2());
         Console.WriteLine( "isMsg3: " + u.isMsg3());
         Console.WriteLine( "getMsg2: " + u.getMsg2());
         try {
            Console.WriteLine( "getMsg3: " + u.getMsg3());
         }
         catch( InvalidCastException x ) {
            Console.WriteLine(x);
         }
         u.set( new Msg3());
         try {
            Console.WriteLine( "getMsg3: " + u.getMsg3());
         }
         catch( InvalidCastException x ) {
            Console.WriteLine(x);
         }
      }
   }

Execution log:

isMsg1: False
isMsg2: True
isMsg3: False
getMsg2: Union.Msg2
System.InvalidCastException: Impossible d'effectuer un cast d'un objet de type 'Union.Msg2' en type 'Union.Msg3'.
   à Union.Union.getMsg3() dans f:\dev\C#\2014\Union\Program.cs:ligne 99
   à Union.Program.Main(String[] args) dans f:\dev\C#\2014\Union\Program.cs:ligne 111
getMsg3: Union.Msg3

The System.InvalidCastException is expected, because we attempt to use a Msg2 as a Msg3.

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