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In awk, how can I do this:

Input:

1  a  f  1  12  v  
2  b  g  2  10  w  
3  c  h  3  19  x  
4  d  i  4  15  y  
5  e  j  5  11  z  

Desired output, by sorting numerical value at $5:

1  a  f  2  10  w  
2  b  g  5  11  z  
3  c  h  1  12  v  
4  d  i  4  15  y  
5  e  j  3  19  x  

Note that the sorting should only affecting $4, $5, and $6 (based on value of $5), in which the previous part of table remains intact.

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean columns $4, $5, and $6? AWK starts at 1 :) –  user647772 Oct 1 '12 at 18:01
    
You're right. It's a typo. Thanks for the correction and the solution! –  nawesita Oct 2 '12 at 3:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This could be done in multiple steps with the help of paste:

$ gawk '{print $1, $2, $3}' in.txt > a.txt
$ gawk '{print $4, $5, $6}' in.txt | sort -k 2 -n b.txt > b.txt
$ paste -d' ' a.txt b.txt
1 a f 2 10 w
2 b g 5 11 z
3 c h 1 12 v
4 d i 4 15 y
5 e j 3 19 x
share|improve this answer
    
Do you have any idea of any other solution without calling external function? Just wonder if it's possible (but may be too tricky to perform) –  nawesita Oct 2 '12 at 3:39
    
sort and paste are not 'external functions' but basic Unix tools. They allow you to build very flexible solutions. –  user647772 Oct 2 '12 at 6:22
    
This doesnt work when the 5th column of original has numbers greater than 19 and less than 10 –  sr01853 Dec 30 '13 at 8:58

Personally, I find using awk to safely sort arrays of columns rather tricky because often you will need to hold and sort on duplicate keys. If you need to selectively sort a group of columns, I would call paste for some assistance:

paste -d ' ' <(awk '{ print $1, $2, $3 }' file.txt) <(awk '{ print $4, $5, $6 | "sort -k 2" }' file.txt)

Results:

1 a f 2 10 w
2 b g 5 11 z
3 c h 1 12 v
4 d i 4 15 y
5 e j 3 19 x
share|improve this answer

This can be done in pure awk, but as @steve said, it's not ideal. gawk has limited sort functions, and awk has no built-in sort at all. That said, here's a (rather hackish) solution using a compare function in gawk:

[ghoti@pc ~/tmp3]$ cat text 
1  a  f  1  12  v  
2  b  g  2  10  w  
3  c  h  3  19  x  
4  d  i  4  15  y  
5  e  j  5  11  z  
[ghoti@pc ~/tmp3]$ cat doit.gawk 
### Function to be called by asort().
function cmp(i1,v1,i2,v2) {
  split(v1,a1); split(v2,a2);
  if (a1[2]>a2[2])      { return 1; }
  else if (a1[2]<a2[2]) { return -1; }
  else                  { return 0; }
}

### Left-hand-side and right-hand-side, are sorted differently.
{
  lhs[NR]=sprintf("%s %s %s",$1,$2,$3);
  rhs[NR]=sprintf("%s %s %s",$4,$5,$6);
}

END {
  asort(rhs,sorted,"cmp");    ### This calls the function we defined, above.
  for (i=1;i<=NR;i++) {       ### Step through the arrays and reassemble.
    printf("%s %s\n",lhs[i],sorted[i]);
  }
}    
[ghoti@pc ~/tmp3]$ gawk -f doit.gawk text 
1 a f 2 10 w
2 b g 5 11 z
3 c h 1 12 v
4 d i 4 15 y
5 e j 3 19 x
[ghoti@pc ~/tmp3]$ 

This keeps your entire input file in arrays, so that lines can be reassembled after the sort. If your input is millions of lines, this may be problematic.

Note that you might want to play with the printf and sprintf functions to set appropriate output field separators.

You can find documentation on using asort() with functions in the gawk man page; look for PROCINFO["sorted_in"].

share|improve this answer
    
I did try to do this using only GNU awk, but I gave up after about 20 minutes. I knew it wasn't impossible +1 –  Steve Oct 3 '12 at 23:05

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