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I have 2 delete statements that are taking a long time to complete. There are several indexes on the columns in where clause.

What is a duplicate? If 2 or more records have same values in columns id,cid,type,trefid,ordrefid,amount and paydt then there are duplicates.

The DELETEs delete about 1 million record.

Can they be re-written in any way to make it quicker.

DELETE FROM TABLE1 A WHERE loaddt < (
    SELECT max(loaddt) FROM TABLE1 B
    WHERE 
    a.id=b.id and
    a.cid=b.cid and
    NVL(a.type,'-99999') = NVL(b.type,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.trefid,'-99999')=NVL(b.trefid,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.ordrefid,'-99999')= NVL(b.ordrefid,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.amount,'-99999')=NVL(b.amount,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.paydt,TO_DATE('9999-12-31','YYYY-MM-DD'))=NVL(b.paydt,TO_DATE('9999-12-31','YYYY-MM-DD'))
);

    COMMIT;

DELETE FROM TABLE1 a where rowid > (
    Select min(rowid) from TABLE1 b
    WHERE 
    a.id=b.id and
    a.cid=b.cid and
    NVL(a.type,'-99999') = NVL(b.type,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.trefid,'-99999')=NVL(b.trefid,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.ordrefid,'-99999')= NVL(b.ordrefid,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.amount,'-99999')=NVL(b.amount,'-99999') and
    NVL(a.paydt,TO_DATE('9999-12-31','YYYY-MM-DD'))=NVL(b.paydt,TO_DATE('9999-12-31','YYYY-MM-DD'))
);

commit;

Explain Plan:

DELETE  TABLE1         

    HASH JOIN 1296491 
    Access Predicates 

        AND 
        A.ID=ITEM_1 
        A.CID=ITEM_2 
        ITEM_3=NVL(TYPE,'-99999') 
        ITEM_4=NVL(TREFID,'-99999') 
        ITEM_5=NVL(ORDREFID,'-99999') 
        ITEM_6=NVL(AMOUNT,(-99999)) 
        ITEM_7=NVL(PAYDT,TO_DATE(' 9999-12-31 00:00:00', 'syyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss')) 

    Filter Predicates 
        LOADDT<MAX(LOADDT)

    TABLE ACCESS  TABLE1     FULL    267904 
    VIEW VW_SQ_1         690385 
    SORT GROUP BY    690385 
        TABLE ACCESS TABLE1      FULL    267904 
share|improve this question
    
what's a long time exactly? Is you real problem you don't know where you're at in the delete process (% complete)? Also, what is your intended logic with the rowid in #2? – tbone Oct 1 '12 at 18:11
    
Long Time=15 hours. I really want to reduce the time it take to delete the duplicates. We load new data every week and delete duplicate records from previous weeks, so in #2 we are trying to delete records if the conditions (where clause) match but with a lower rowid. Lower rowid is associated to records inserted previous week. Hope I am making sense here. – Ram Oct 1 '12 at 18:21
    
What is a duplicate? If 2 or more records have same values in columns id,cid,type,trefid,ordrefid,amount and paydt then there are duplicates. – Ram Oct 1 '12 at 18:24
1  
you realize rowids can't be used (reliably) to sort by time. They say where a row exists, not when. – tbone Oct 1 '12 at 18:43
    
tbone, I understand that. That's the reason we have a loaddt based dup delete before that. – Ram Oct 1 '12 at 19:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

How large is the table? If count of deleted rows is up to 12% then you may think about index. Could you somehow partition your table - like week by week and then scan only actual week?

Maybe this could be more effecient. When you're using aggregate function, then oracle must walk through all relevant rows (in your case fullscan), but when you use exists it stops when the first occurence is found. (and of course the query would be much faster, when there was one function-based(because of NVL) index on all columns in where clause)

DELETE FROM TABLE1 A 
WHERE exists (
SELECT 1 
FROM TABLE1 B
WHERE 
A.loaddt != b.loaddt
a.id=b.id and
a.cid=b.cid and
NVL(a.type,'-99999') = NVL(b.type,'-99999') and
NVL(a.trefid,'-99999')=NVL(b.trefid,'-99999') and
NVL(a.ordrefid,'-99999')= NVL(b.ordrefid,'-99999') and
NVL(a.amount,'-99999')=NVL(b.amount,'-99999') and
NVL(a.paydt,TO_DATE('9999-12-31','YYYY-MM-DD'))=NVL(b.paydt,TO_DATE('9999-12-31','YYYY-MM-DD'))
);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning partitioning. (Although I'm not sure where you get "12%" from?) – Jon Heller Oct 2 '12 at 3:41
    
12% is based on my experiences(from guesed row size and data block size in example - we have similar tables), but it can be anything from 1% to 100%. More info here I ment that blind adding index may not help. (and it slows down delete operation, so it may even worsen performance) – jakub.petr Oct 2 '12 at 9:09
    
jakub the DELETE deletes much more than 12% of the records. Also in the query you have A.loaddt != b.loaddt, should that be A.loaddt = b.loaddt? Sorry can you please explain what you are doing in this query? – Ram Oct 4 '12 at 12:27
    
Thanks jakub, that DELETE was super fast! I just changed A.loaddt < b.loaddt – Ram Oct 4 '12 at 14:21

Although some may disagree, I am a proponent of running large, long running deletes procedurally. In my view it is much easier to control and track progress (and your DBA will like you better ;-) Also, not sure why you need to join table1 to itself to identify duplicates (and I'd be curious if you ever run into snapshot too old issues with your current approach). You also shouldn't need multiple delete statements, all duplicates should be handled in one process. Finally, you should check WHY you're constantly re-introducing duplicates each week, and perhaps change the load process (maybe doing a merge/upsert rather than all inserts).

That said, you might try something like:

-- first create mat view to find all duplicates
create materialized view my_dups_mv
tablespace my_tablespace
build immediate
refresh complete on demand
as
select id,cid,type,trefid,ordrefid,amount,paydt, count(1) as cnt
from table1
group by id,cid,type,trefid,ordrefid,amount,paydt
having count(1) > 1;

-- dedup data (or put into procedure and schedule along with mat view refresh above)
declare
  -- make sure my_dups_mv is refreshed first
  cursor dup_cur is
  select * from my_dups_mv;

  type duprec_t is record(row_id rowid);
  duprec duprec_t;
  type duptab_t is table of duprec_t index by pls_integer;
  duptab duptab_t;

  l_ctr pls_integer := 0;
  l_dupcnt pls_integer := 0;
begin
  for rec in dup_cur
  loop
    l_ctr := l_ctr + 1;

    -- assuming needed indexes exist
    select rowid
    bulk collect into duptab
    from table1
    where id = rec.id
    and cid = rec.cid
    and type = rec.type
    and trefid = rec.trefid
    and ordrefid = rec.ordrefid
    and amount = rec.amount
    and paydt = rec.paydt
    -- order by whatever makes sense to make the "keeper" float to top
    order by loaddt desc
    ;

    for i in 2 .. duptab.count
    loop
      l_dupcnt := l_dupcnt + 1;
      delete from table1 where rowid = duptab(i).row_id;
    end loop;

    if (mod(l_ctr, 10000) = 0) then
      -- log to log table here (calling autonomous procedure you'll need to implement)
      insert_logtable('Table1 deletes', 'Commit reached, deleted ' || l_dupcnt || ' rows');
      commit;
    end if;

  end loop;
  commit;
end;

Check your log table for progress status.

share|improve this answer
    
Why not forall i in duptab.first .. duptab.last (otherwise I agree if it's taking 15 hours)? – Ben Oct 1 '12 at 19:56
    
@Ben hey Ben, I'm removing the 2nd through the last, keeping the first. – tbone Oct 2 '12 at 0:47

1. Parallel

alter session enable parallel dml;

DELETE /*+ PARALLEL */ FROM TABLE1 A WHERE loaddt < (
...

Assuming you have Enterprise Edition, a sane server configuration, and you are on 11g. If you're not on 11g, the parallel syntax is slightly different.

2. Reduce memory requirements

The plan shows a hash join, which is probably a good thing. But without any useful filters, Oracle has to hash the entire table. (Tbone's query, that only use a GROUP BY, looks nicer and may run faster. But it will also probably run into the same problem trying to sort or hash the entire table.)

If the hash can't fit in memory it must be written to disk, which can be very slow. Since you run this query every week, only one of the tables needs to look at all the rows. Depending on exactly when it runs, you can add something like this to the end of the query: ) where b.loaddt >= sysdate - 14. This may significantly reduce the amount of writing to temporary tablespace. And it may also reduce read IO if you use some partitioning strategy like jakub.petr suggested.

3. Active Report

If you want to know exactly what your query is doing, run the Active Report:

select dbms_sqltune.report_sql_monitor(sql_id => 'YOUR_SQL_ID_HERE', type => 'active')
from dual;

(Save the output to an .html file and open it with a browser.)

share|improve this answer

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