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I'm a beginner in python, and I have a dictionary:

players = {"player 1":0, "player 2":0}

And in this code, I will describe what I want to achieve:

def play_ghost():
    for p_id in cycle(players):
        ##code..
        if end_game() : ##if this is true, add 1 to the OTHER player
            ##what to write here ?

Sorry if my question is kinda obvious but I really don't want to achieve this using if statements and such. I'm looking for a single method or something that can select the other element (like in JavaScript where I can select sibling).

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I don't see a reference to the other player in your code. Maybe I don't understand something, but why don't you use players[the_other_player_id]+=1? –  Max Oct 1 '12 at 18:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

wins = {"player1": 0, "player2": 0}
this, other = "player1", "player2"
for i in range(rounds_count): # really, variable i don't use
    this, other = other, this # swap players
    if end_game():
        wins[this] +=1
    else:
        wins[other] += 1  
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You should really be using an ordered type, I think.

players = [0, 0]

players[1] # player 2, because lists are 0-based
players[1:] # all players but the first
# if you want to do more complex selects, do this, but DON'T for simple stuff
[player for index, player in enumerate(players) if index == 1]
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Bite the bullet and just define an other dict (it's not so bad -- it makes the rest of your code pretty readable):

players = {"player 1":0, "player 2":0}
names = players.keys()
other = dict(zip(names, names[::-1]))
# other  = {'player 1': 'player 2', 'player 2': 'player 1'}

def play_ghost():
    for p_id in cycle(players):
        ##code..
        if end_game() : ##if this is true, add 1 to the OTHER player
            players[other[p_id]] += 1
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You should use lists.
Lists are similar to dictionaries; the main difference is the fact that they index by numbers and not by keys. Therefore:

players = [0, 0]
def play_ghost():
    for index in range(len(players)):
    #code...
        if end_game():
            players[(index + 1) % 2] += 1  # Uses mode to select other player
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1  
That for index in range(players) doesn't work (range expects integer arguments). You're missing a len in there (and also a colon : at the end of the line. –  Lukas Graf Oct 1 '12 at 18:18
    
And I wouldn't say lists aren't "exactly like dictionaries except ...". They're similar in some aspects, but still a pretty different data structure. They're not ordered for example. –  Lukas Graf Oct 1 '12 at 18:22
    
Thanks both! fixed –  lolopop Oct 2 '12 at 11:14

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