Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have two integer values a and b, but I need their ratio in floating point. I know that a<b and I want to calculate a/b, so if I use integer division I'll always get 0 with a remainder of a.

How can I force c to be a floating point number in Python in the following?

c = a / b
share|improve this question
49  
It is automatic in Python 3. – riza Aug 12 '09 at 19:48
29  
@JasonS: Yes it is, if you want integer division you use // instead of / – ThiefMaster Mar 3 '12 at 16:26

11 Answers 11

up vote 439 down vote accepted
>>> from __future__ import division
>>> a = 4
>>> b = 6
>>> c = a / b
>>> c
0.66666666666666663
share|improve this answer
81  
If you go this route and still need some integer division, you can do it like a // b – Steve Trout Aug 12 '09 at 18:35
28  
Note that in Python 3, this is the default behavior. – Sam DeFabbia-Kane Aug 12 '09 at 21:23
7  
It's also the default behavior in the Idle (ipython) shell, but not the ipython script interpreter, which can really cause headaches when debugging scripts run by the default system python interpreter. – hobs Sep 23 '11 at 4:53
4  
Answering my own question operator.truediv() – Caltor Oct 3 '13 at 10:57
7  
@octi's comment seems wrong. wish I tested before voting up – Good Person Jun 4 '14 at 20:27

You can cast to float by doing c = a / float(b). If the numerator or denominator is a float, then the result will be also.

share|improve this answer
42  
I was doing "c = float(a / b)" and wondering why it's not working xD – Acute Feb 17 '13 at 15:50
6  
its because a/b will be an int, i.e something whole number because int by int division truncates the fraction. Now when you convert a whole number to a float you get "whole number-point-zero" (x.0) that's why it didn't work... @Acute – Anshuman Dwibhashi Aug 15 '13 at 11:21
6  
this is not the better answer than using __future__. b might lose information when cast as float! The correct workaround is to multiply other multiplicand by 1.0. – Antti Haapala Apr 12 '15 at 15:28
2  
Agreeing with @AnttiHaapala - It seems mixing float and int can really be hard to reason about in python and a source for bugs. I'd say stick with one option unless there is a good reason not to!! – worldsayshi Sep 10 '15 at 17:15
2  
It will fail for example if the casted argument is something else than a float or int already. The correct approach is discussed in detail in PEP 238. That is why this answer received a downvote and the answer by Pinochle got my upvote. – Antti Haapala Sep 18 '15 at 15:23
c = a / (b * 1.0)
share|improve this answer
13  
float(b) is better. – Erin Aug 12 '09 at 18:29
39  
float(b) is not better if b == 1j (or some other complex number). In that case float(b) would raise a TypeError. The question does say a and b are integers so it won't matter in this case - but the correct workaround in the general case is to multiply one of the arguments by 0.1, see pep 238 - python.org/dev/peps/pep-0238. – Tom Dunham Aug 12 '09 at 18:57
20  
@Tom Dunham, I think you mean multiply by 1.0, not 0.1. – Brian Neal Aug 12 '09 at 20:03
5  
whoops - yes I did mean 1.0; thanks Brian. – Tom Dunham Aug 13 '09 at 13:42
6  
I think c = 1.0 * a / b may be better. – acgtyrant Apr 11 '14 at 8:21

In Python 3.x, the single slash (/) always means true (non-truncating) division. (The // operator is used for truncating division.) In Python 2.x (2.2 and above), you can get this same behavior by putting a

from __future__ import division

at the top of your module.

share|improve this answer

Just making any of the parameters for division in floating-point format also produces the output in floating-point.

Example:

>>> 4.0/3
1.3333333333333333

or,

>>> 4 / 3.0
1.3333333333333333

or,

>>> 4 / float(3)
1.3333333333333333

or,

>>> float(4) / 3
1.3333333333333333
share|improve this answer
4  
But you might later be tempted to do 1.0 + 1/3 or float(c) + a/b or float(a/b) and you'll be disappointed with the answer. Better to use python 3+ or import the __future__.division module, (see accepted answer), to always get the answer you expect. The existing division rules create insidious, hard-to-trace math error. – hobs Sep 23 '11 at 4:47
    
@JoeCondron Did you try python -c 'a=10; b=3.0; print a/b'? – gsbabil Sep 18 '15 at 18:51
    
I didn't have to because it obviously works in this scenario. However, what if a and 'b', e.g., are the outputs of an integer-value function? E.g., a = len(list1), b = len(list2). – JoeCondron Sep 18 '15 at 20:44
    
@JoeCondron: good point. I just updated the answer to include float(..). I think multiplying by 1.0, as @Pinochle suggested below, could also be useful. – gsbabil Sep 18 '15 at 21:18

How can I force division to be floating point in Python?

Use Python 3

In Python 3, to get true division, you simply do a / b.

>>> 1/2
0.5

Floor division, the classic division behavior for integers, is now a // b:

>>> 1//2
0
>>> 1//2.0
0.0

If Using Python 2

In Python 2, it's not so simple. Some ways of dealing with classic Python 2 division are better and more robust than others.

Recommended

You can get Python 3 division behavior in any given module with the following import at the top:

from __future__ import division

which then applies Python 3 style division to the entire module. It also works in a python shell at any given point. In Python 2:

>>> from __future__ import division
>>> 1/2
0.5
>>> 1//2
0
>>> 1//2.0
0.0

This is really the best solution as it ensures the code in your module is more forward compatible with Python 3.

Other Options

If you don't want to apply this to the entire module, you're limited to a few workarounds. The most popular is to coerce one of the operands to a float. One robust solution is a / (b * 1.0). In a fresh Python shell:

>>> 1/(2 * 1.0)
0.5

Also robust is truediv from the operator module operator.truediv(a, b), but this is likely slower because it's a function call:

>>> from operator import truediv
>>> truediv(1, 2)
0.5

Not Recommended

Commonly seen is a / float(b). But this will raise a TypeError if b is a complex number - this may not be what you want.

>>> 1 / float(2)
0.5
>>> 1 / float(2j)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: can't convert complex to float

You can also run Python with the -Qnew flag, but this has the downside of executing all modules with the new Python 3 behavior, and some of your modules may expect classic division, so this is not recommended. But to demonstrate:

$ python -Qnew -c 'print 1/2'
0.5
$ python -Qnew -c 'print 1/2j'
-0.5j
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for this clarifying answer! I like that you showed why not convert to float and how to use the new division in Python 2! – strpeter Sep 23 '15 at 8:11

Add a dot (.) to indicate floating point numbers

>>> 4/3.
1.3333333333333333

or

>>> from __future__ import division
>>> 4/3
1.3333333333333333
share|improve this answer

This will also work

>>> u=1./5
>>> print u

0.2

share|improve this answer
    
This is, by far, the simplest syntax. Should be voted further up the list! – Vaibhav Dec 25 '15 at 8:33

If you want to use "true" (floating point) division by default, there is a command line flag:

python -Q new foo.py

There are some drawbacks (from the PEP):

It has been argued that a command line option to change the default is evil. It can certainly be dangerous in the wrong hands: for example, it would be impossible to combine a 3rd party library package that requires -Qnew with another one that requires -Qold.

You can learn more about the other flags values that change / warn-about the behavior of division by looking at the python man page.

For full details on division changes read: PEP 238 -- Changing the Division Operator

share|improve this answer
from operator import truediv

c = truediv(a, b)
share|improve this answer
2  
That's not ideal, though, since it doesn't work in the case where a is an int and b is a float. A better solution along the same lines is to do from operator import truediv and then use truediv(a, b). – Mark Dickinson Sep 18 '15 at 12:39
    
Yeah you're right. I was assuming both integers as this is the only time when the division ops differ but you really want a general solution. I didn't actually know you could import the operator or that it doesn't work at all for float divisors. Answer edited. – JoeCondron Sep 18 '15 at 14:17
from operator import truediv

c = truediv(a, b)

where a is dividend and b is the divisor. This function is handy when quotient after division of two integers is a float.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this in Python 2? – Nathan Fellman Jan 8 at 9:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.