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Can you tell me if the two following codes' meanings are exactly the same (under all OS, including Mac, which I can't test)?

Code 1

if($('#mail1').val()==$('#mail2').val()){} 
else{
alert("Mail inputs don't match!");return;
}

Code 2

if($('#mail1').val()!=$('#mail2').val()){
alert("Mail inputs don't match!");return;} 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first code is redundant, you don't need the if-else, the second one is more correct but this is even more correct:

if($('#mail1').val() !== $('#mail2').val()){
  alert("Mail inputs don't match!");
  return;
} 
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Can you tell me if the two following codes' meanings are exactly the same

Yes they are.

I see an empty if block sometimes in code. My guess is some developers find it easier to read or the empty if block serves as a future placeholder. Either way, I don't use or advocate such coding practices.

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It does but you should use === instead of == or !== instead of != . The triple equals avoids the type coercion.

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1  
While I agree that === is good practice, in this case there'll be no coercion since it will always be a string to string comparison. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 1 '12 at 18:18
    
it's a good coding practice. Clearly the OP is new to JS and should get into the habit of using it. –  dbrin Oct 1 '12 at 18:21
    
Another point to make is that .val() may return an array if field is multivalue field. –  dbrin Oct 1 '12 at 18:28
    
In the case of a multiple select, I'd suggest that the coercion of the == would be desired. Imagine if both inputs have "foo" as their value, but one of them is a multiple. The == will perform a toString conversion on the Array, resulting in a comparison of "foo" == "foo", which would provide the desired result, since from the developer's perspective, both inputs were assigned the same value. But the strict === will see them as unequal, which would be an odd result for the intended task. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 1 '12 at 18:51
    
Here's a demo: jsfiddle.net/Q5m3p –  I Hate Lazy Oct 1 '12 at 18:59

It will be the same. You have:

if (something) then do nothing
else do this-action

and

if (not something) then do this-action

Same, yes?

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