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This question already has an answer here:

If I have an array like this:

1 4 9 16 9 7 4 9 11 

What is the best way to reverse the array so that it looks like this:

11 9 4 7 9 16 9 4 1 

I have the code below, but I feel it is a little tedious:

public int[] reverse3(int[] nums) {
    return new int[] { nums[8], nums[7], nums[6], nums[5], num[4],
                       nums[3], nums[2], nums[1], nums[0] };
}

Is there a simpler way?

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marked as duplicate by Vadzim, Joeri Hendrickx, LondonRob, Olaf Kock, iamnotmaynard Sep 2 '15 at 19:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Use a loop to swap each of the elements in the first half with the elements in the second half. – Peter Lawrey Oct 1 '12 at 18:23
    
If i used void that means i wont be able to use the return statement in this method right? – PHZE OXIDE Oct 1 '12 at 18:27
    
That is true. You can either reserve the exist array which may or may not be returned. Or you can return a copy. – Peter Lawrey Oct 1 '12 at 18:31
    
Based on the idea you already had, I would hazard a guess that you are very experienced in development, so I will point out an easy alternative. Just do what you want in a reversed for-loop, instead of actually reversing the array. for (int i = someArray.length - 1; i > 0; i--) { doStuff(someArray[i]); } reversedArray[j++] = firstArray[i]; } – Letharion Oct 1 '12 at 18:41

15 Answers 15

Collections.reverse() can do that job for you if you put your numbers in a List of Integers.

List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(1, 4, 9, 16, 9, 7, 4, 9, 11);
System.out.println(list);
Collections.reverse(list);
System.out.println(list);

Output:

[1, 4, 9, 16, 9, 7, 4, 9, 11]
[11, 9, 4, 7, 9, 16, 9, 4, 1]
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain a little more thanks – PHZE OXIDE Oct 1 '12 at 18:24
1  
Please see the edit to the answer. – Vikdor Oct 1 '12 at 18:28
    
Why instantiating a new ArrayList? Arrays.asList() already returns a List. – Kirill Rakhman Oct 7 '12 at 13:54
    
Thanks @cypressious, I was under the impression that Arrays.asList would return an unmodifiable list. Corrected that. – Vikdor Oct 7 '12 at 14:08

If you want to reverse the array in-place:

Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(array));

It works since Arrays.asList returns a write-through proxy to the original array.

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4  
Though an old answer it costed me some time to figure out... This does not work for the op as int[] is an object and Arrays.asList(array) will return List<int[]> and not List<int> (which is impossible anyway) so actually a List with exactly one entry which is reversed the same. This is true for all primitive arrays! – Dennis Ich Aug 26 '15 at 16:19

If you don't want to use Collections then you can do this:

for (i = 0; i < array.length / 2; i++) {
  int temp = array[i];
  array[i] = array[array.length - 1 - i];
  array[array.length - 1 - i] = temp;
}
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1  
Isn't it worth to put array.length / 2 part to outside before the for-loop? It will be recalculated every iteration, I believe. – Jin Kwon Mar 10 '14 at 3:24
    
@JinKwon I believe that the compiler will enhance it that way, you can try it out with javap – Zarathustra Mar 27 '14 at 18:49
    
@JinKwon To clarify this, I didn't mean javac, I was talking about the JIT compiler, the optimisation that happens at run time. – Zarathustra Mar 28 '14 at 10:24

I like to keep the original array and return a copy. This is a generic version:

public static <T> T[] reverse(T[] array) {
    T[] copy = array.clone();
    Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(copy));
    return copy;
}

without keeping the original array:

public static <T> void reverse(T[] array) {
    Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(array));
}
share|improve this answer
    
This was really helpful. I like the fact that you didn't change the original array, instead you returned a new array. – madhuspot Mar 3 at 4:56

try this:

public int[] reverse3(int[] nums) {
    int[] reversed = new int[nums.length];
    for (int i=0; i<nums.length; i++) {
        reversed[i] = nums[nums.length - 1 - i];
    }
    return reversed;
}

my input was:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

and output I got:

12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

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You could use org.apache.commons.lang.ArrayUtils : ArrayUtils.reverse(array)

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In place reversal with minimum amount of swaps.

for (int i = 0; i < a.length / 2; i++) {
    int tmp = a[i];
    a[i] = a[a.length - 1 - i];
    a[a.length - 1 - i] = tmp;
}
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Or you could loop through it backeards

int[] firstArray = new int[]{1,2,3,4};
int[] reversedArray = new int[firstArray.length];
int j = 0;
for (int i = firstArray.length -1; i > 0; i--){
    reversedArray[j++] = firstArray[i];
}

(note: I have not compiled this but hopefully it is correct)

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I would do something like this:

public int[] reverse3(int[] nums) {
  int[] numsReturn = new int[nums.length()]; 
  int count = nums.length()-1;
  for(int num : nums) {
    numsReturn[count] = num;
    count--;
  }
  return numsReturn;
}
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1  
@RodrigoKossmann.. Or you can just use: - numsReturn[count--] = num – Rohit Jain Oct 1 '12 at 18:36

you messed up

int[] firstArray = new int[]{1,2,3,4};
int[] reversedArray = new int[firstArray.length];
int j = 0;
for (int i = firstArray.length -1; i >= 0; i--){
    reversedArray[j++] = firstArray[i];
}
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 public void swap(int[] arr,int a,int b)
 {
    int temp=arr[a];
    arr[a]=arr[b];
    arr[b]=temp;        
}
public int[] reverseArray(int[] arr){
    int size=arr.length-1;

    for(int i=0;i<size;i++){

        swap(arr,i,size--); 

    }

    return arr;
}
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The following will reverse in place the array between indexes i and j (to reverse the whole array call reverse(a, 0, a.length - 1))

    public void reverse(int[] a, int i , int j) {
        int ii =  i;
        int jj = j;

        while (ii < jj) {
            swap(ii, jj);
            ++ii;
            --jj;
        }
    }
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In case you don't want to use a temporary variable, you can also do like this:

final int len = arr.length;
for (int i=0; i < (len/2); i++) {
    arr[i] += arr[len - 1 - i]; //  a = a+b
    arr[len - 1 - i] = arr[i] - arr[len - 1 - i];   //  b = a-b
    arr[i] -= arr[len - 1 - i]; //  a = a-b
}
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This code would help:

int [] a={1,2,3,4,5,6,7};
for(int i=a.length-1;i>=0;i--)
  System.out.println(a[i]);
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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. – user3522371 Dec 4 '14 at 17:52
    
@Begueradj - it looks like an answer to me - not necessarily a good one, but it's an answer. – Chris Dec 4 '14 at 17:56

you can send the original array to a method for example:

after that you create a new array to hold the reversed elements

public static void reverse(int[] a){

int[] reversedArray = new int[a.length];

for(int i = 0 ; i<a.length; i++){
reversedArray[i] = a[a.length -1 -i];


}
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