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If I have an array like this:

1 4 9 16 9 7 4 9 11 

What is the best way to reverse the array so that it looks like this:

11 9 4 7 9 16 9 4 1 

I have the code below, but I feel it is a little tedious:

public int[] reverse3(int[] nums) {
    return new int[] { nums[8], nums[7], nums[6], nums[5], num[4],
                       nums[3], nums[2], nums[1], nums[0] };
}

Is there a simpler way?

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4  
Use a loop to swap each of the elements in the first half with the elements in the second half. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 1 '12 at 18:23
    
If i used void that means i wont be able to use the return statement in this method right? –  PHZE OXIDE Oct 1 '12 at 18:27
    
That is true. You can either reserve the exist array which may or may not be returned. Or you can return a copy. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 1 '12 at 18:31
    
Based on the idea you already had, I would hazard a guess that you are very experienced in development, so I will point out an easy alternative. Just do what you want in a reversed for-loop, instead of actually reversing the array. for (int i = someArray.length - 1; i > 0; i--) { doStuff(someArray[i]); } reversedArray[j++] = firstArray[i]; } –  Letharion Oct 1 '12 at 18:41

11 Answers 11

Collections.reverse() can do that job for you if you put your numbers in a List of Integers.

List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(1, 4, 9, 16, 9, 7, 4, 9, 11);
System.out.println(list);
Collections.reverse(list);
System.out.println(list);

Output:

[1, 4, 9, 16, 9, 7, 4, 9, 11]
[11, 9, 4, 7, 9, 16, 9, 4, 1]
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1  
+1, I didnt know that. –  sans481 Oct 1 '12 at 18:23
    
Can you explain a little more thanks –  PHZE OXIDE Oct 1 '12 at 18:24
1  
Please see the edit to the answer. –  Vikdor Oct 1 '12 at 18:28
    
Why instantiating a new ArrayList? Arrays.asList() already returns a List. –  cypressious Oct 7 '12 at 13:54
    
Thanks @cypressious, I was under the impression that Arrays.asList would return an unmodifiable list. Corrected that. –  Vikdor Oct 7 '12 at 14:08
Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(array));
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If you don'y want to use collection then you can do this:

for (i = 0; i < array.length / 2; i++) {
  int temp = array[i];
  array[i] = array[array.length - 1 - i];
  array[array.length - 1 - i] = temp;
}
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i mistakenly wrote 'a' in place of '1'. –  kanhai shah Oct 1 '12 at 18:31
    
Isn't it worth to put array.length / 2 part to outside before the for-loop? It will be recalculated every iteration, I believe. –  Jin Kwon Mar 10 at 3:24
    
@JinKwon I believe that the compiler will enhance it that way, you can try it out with javap –  Zarathustra Mar 27 at 18:49
    
@Zarathustra Can you please take a look on my question? stackoverflow.com/questions/22707936/… –  Jin Kwon Mar 28 at 8:58
    
@JinKwon To clarify this, I didn't mean javac, I was talking about the JIT compiler, the optimisation that happens at run time. –  Zarathustra Mar 28 at 10:24

I would do something like this:

public int[] reverse3(int[] nums) {
  int[] numsReturn = new int[nums.length()]; 
  int count = nums.length()-1;
  for(int num : nums) {
    numsReturn[count] = num;
    count--;
  }
  return numsReturn;
}
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1  
That will copy the values in the same order. You need to copy from the end and count backwards. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 1 '12 at 18:32
    
That will not reverse.. You are actually creating a copy of your passed array.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 1 '12 at 18:33
    
ok, i will change. –  Rodrigo Kossmann Oct 1 '12 at 18:34
    
@RodrigoKossmann.. Or you can just use: - numsReturn[count--] = num –  Rohit Jain Oct 1 '12 at 18:36
    
+1 For doing it with enhanced-for loop. –  Rohit Jain Oct 1 '12 at 18:37

Or you could loop through it backeards

int[] firstArray = new int[]{1,2,3,4};
int[] reversedArray = new int[firstArray.length];
int j = 0;
for (int i = firstArray.length -1; i > 0; i--){
    reversedArray[j++] = firstArray[i];
}

(note: I have not compiled this but hopefully it is correct)

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I like to keep the original array and return a copy. This is a generic version:

public static <T> T[] reverse(T[] array) {
    T[] copy = array.clone();
    Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(copy));
    return copy;
}

without keeping the original array:

public static <T> void reverse(T[] array) {
    Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(array));
}
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you messed up

int[] firstArray = new int[]{1,2,3,4};
int[] reversedArray = new int[firstArray.length];
int j = 0;
for (int i = firstArray.length -1; i >= 0; i--){
    reversedArray[j++] = firstArray[i];
}
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You could use org.apache.commons.lang.ArrayUtils : ArrayUtils.reverse(array)

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try this:

public int[] reverse3(int[] nums) {
    int[] reversed = new int[nums.length];
    for (int i=0; i<nums.length; i++) {
        reversed[i] = nums[nums.length - 1 - i];
    }
    return reversed;
}

my input was:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

and output I got:

12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

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In place reversal with minimum amount of swaps.

for (int i = 0; i < a.length / 2; i++) {
    int tmp = a[i];
    a[i] = a[a.length - 1 - i];
    a[a.length - 1 - i] = tmp;
}
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This code would help:

int [] a={1,2,3,4,5,6,7};
for(int i=a.length-1;i>=0;i--)
  System.out.println(a[i]);
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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Begueradj Dec 4 at 17:52
    
@Begueradj - it looks like an answer to me - not necessarily a good one, but it's an answer. –  Chris Dec 4 at 17:56

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