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I noticed a couple other posts around that were similar to my problem but found that they weren't specific to my scenario or I am just not understanding things very well.

My situation: I am trying to send mail from a LAMP server using the PHP mail() function. I want to relay the mail to another dedicated mail server.

Problem: It seems I am not able to send mail...sometimes. Sometimes it seems capable of sending mail to accounts outside of the domain but it fails to send any mail to accounts within the domain/network. I have seen logs often complaining about it not being able to authenticate to the domain controller...but it shouldn't have to worry about that should it?

I guess the part I am confused about is does the PHP mail() function automatically create an SMTP message to the server? Or do I have to set the php.ini settings to look at the localhost and then configure sendmail/postfix to send the message to the mail server. Also, why would it bother to authenticate with the domain controller if I only specified that the LAMP server try to connect with the mail server?

Hopefully someone can help me get this sorted out. It's been bothering me for a while now and haven't been able to find a solution. Thank you,

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have you considered using phpmailer to sent email using SMTP or so? Mail() is a little outdated. You can also set some mail parameters in php.ini –  John Oct 1 '12 at 18:29
    
Unfortunately I think I am stuck using mail(). I am trying to work with an application that was developed by another company and their source is encrypted (maybe that's the wrong word) until we purchase the software - but they did reveal that they use the mail() function to send mail. We want to work out the kinks before buying it. I'll have to take a look at phpmailer just in case it comes up as an option. –  Stephen R Oct 1 '12 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

does the PHP mail() function automatically create an SMTP message to the server? Or do I have to set the php.ini settings to look at the localhost and then configure sendmail/postfix to send the message to the mail server

PHP's mail() function doesn't do that much by itself. On linux, it will typically connect to a local instance of sendmail or similar, using settings defined in php.ini. Check out this section from example php.ini:

[mail function]
; For Win32 only.
; SMTP = localhost
; smtp_port = 25

; For Win32 only.
;sendmail_from = me@example.com

; For Unix only.  You may supply arguments as well (default: "sendmail -t -i").
sendmail_path = /usr/sbin/sendmail -t -i

For windows, SMTP server at configured port is used by mail(). For linux, defined sendmail path is used.

Using other words, PHP mail() function on windows connects to a SMTP server, be it local or remote. PHP mail() on Linux cannot do the same. On Linux, the function will only use a local sendmail installation that you need to set up yourself to connect to a SMTP server. Alternative for that kind of configuration is to use PHPMailer, Swiftmailer, Zend_Mail or similar, that provide SMTP functionality by themselves.


why would it bother to authenticate with the domain controller if I only specified that the LAMP server try to connect with the mail server?

I'm far from being an expert on this, but as far as I've understood, you need to be authenticated user in your network to access outside resources which mailing would need. A domain controller gives out that kind of permissions.

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I kind of figured that might be the case that it is requiring some authentication since I was getting those errors. The part I am confused about is I have done some simple mail stuff with Perl and it didn't require me to authenticate to the server...Unless Perl was just doing wizard magic and was sending it from the local LAMP server. I kind of assumed that mail() would require sendmail or other, but I guess I was confused on the semantics of setting the php.ini file to look at the remote server...or the local server? Thanks for your help –  Stephen R Oct 1 '12 at 18:57
    
@StephenR PHP mail() on windows can talk to a SMTP server, be it local or remote. PHP mail() on Linux cannot; it will only use a local sendmail installation that you need to set up yourself to connect to a SMTP server. OR use PHPMailer, Swiftmailer, Zend_Mail or similar, that provide this functionality. –  eis Oct 1 '12 at 19:02
    
That actually helps clear things up in my head. I guess that means I have to go figure out how to configure some mail relay application to get it to work. Thanks again! –  Stephen R Oct 1 '12 at 19:04
    
No prob. There is a longer thread about this same topic, too. –  eis Oct 1 '12 at 19:06
    
Added that to the answer, too, so it can be marked as accepted (if you feel that it is the answer). –  eis Oct 2 '12 at 9:02

Start using Swiftmailer (documentation) or PhpMailer, your life will be easier...

Swiftmailer example:

require_once 'lib/swift_required.php';
$transport = Swift_MailTransport::newInstance();
$mailer = Swift_Mailer::newInstance($transport);
$message = Swift_Message::newInstance('Wonderful Subject')
    ->setFrom(array('john@doe.com' => 'John Doe'))
    ->setTo(array('receiver@domain.org', 'other@domain.org' => 'A name'))
    ->setBody('Here is the message itself');
$mailer->send($message);

PhpMailer example :

$mail             = new PHPMailer(); // defaults to using php "mail()"
$mail->SetFrom('name@yourdomain.com', 'First Last');
$mail->AddReplyTo("name@yourdomain.com","First Last");
$mail->AddAddress("whoto@otherdomain.com", "John Doe");
$mail->Subject    = "PHPMailer Test Subject via mail(), basic";
$mail->AltBody    = "To view the message, please use an HTML compatible email viewer!"; // optional, comment out and test
$mail->MsgHTML($body);
$mail->AddAttachment("images/phpmailer.gif");      // attachment
$mail->AddAttachment("images/phpmailer_mini.gif"); // attachment
if(!$mail->Send()) {
    echo "Mailer Error: " . $mail->ErrorInfo;
} else {
    echo "Message sent!";
}

I prefer Swiftmailer, but you select you best choice ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
While I cannot use either of those in this case because it is not part of the code that I am working with...I am interested to know if either of these require the use of a mail relay system or mail server? Can it send it directly from the LAMP server itself? I was under the impression I would need a mail server to handle any SMTP and in my case I want to forward my mail I wish to send to the mail server. –  Stephen R Oct 1 '12 at 18:53
    
Both, swift and phpmailer, have sending that supports SMTP and mail(). You choose what you need. And YES, if you wish to send via SMTP then you will need yourown mail server, or connect to some other (like your ISP's, etc). –  Glavić Oct 1 '12 at 19:27

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