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Perl terms confuse me and it's not my native language, so bear with me. I'll try to use the right terms, but I'll give an example just to make sure.

So I have a hash reference in the variable $foo. Lets say that $foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'} is an array reference. That is I can get the first member of the array by assigning $foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'}->[0] to a scalar.

when I do this:

foreach (@$foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'})
{
    #some code that deals with $_
}

I get the error "Not an ARRAY reference at script.pl line 41"

But when I do this it works:

$myarr = $foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'};
foreach (@$myarr)
{
    #some code that deals with $_
}

Is there something I'm not understanding? Is there a way I can get the first example to work? I tried wrapping the expression in parentheses with the @ on the outside, but that didn't work. Thanks ahead of time for the help.

share|improve this question
    
The parser has to understand what you mean, and the syntax you try at the first go things you want to dereference @$foo, which you can't in your case. It's all about how different tokens bind to the things around them. We have a longer explanation in Intermediate Perl. :) –  brian d foy Oct 1 '12 at 23:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
$myarr = $foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'};
foreach (@$myarr)
{
    #some code that deals with $_
}

If you replace your $myarr in for loop with its RHS, it looks like: -

foreach (@{$foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'}})
{
    #some code that deals with $_
}
share|improve this answer
    
For anyone else who stumbles upon this, the key to this answer is the curly braces that encase the entire expression. I wish I could mark two answers because the explanation on the precedence issue is also very helpful. –  Jason Thompson Oct 1 '12 at 19:28
4  
@JasonThompson Then why don't you mark the answer with the explanation as the correct one? –  TLP Oct 1 '12 at 19:48
    
Why a down vote on an accepted answer?? Can the downvoter leave a comment here?? –  Rohit Jain Oct 8 '12 at 17:58

It's just a precedence issue.

@$foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'}

means

( ( @{ $foo } )->{'bar'} )->{'baz'}

$foo does not contain an array reference, thus the error. You don't get the precedence issue if you don't omit the optional curlies around the reference expression.

@{ $foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'} }
share|improve this answer

It should look like

foreach (@{$foo->{'bar'}->{'baz'}})
{
    #some code that deals with $_
}
share|improve this answer

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