Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
var Obj = {
   func1 : function() {
      // some code
      if (this._hasChainedFunc()) {
         // block should be CALLED
      }
      return this;
   },
   func2 : function() {  
      // some code
      if (this._hasChainedFunc()) {
         // block should be NOT called
      }
      return this;
   },
   _hasChainedFunc : function() {
     // code which detects if there is a chained function???
   }
}

Obj.func1().func2();

Is there a possible implementation for function _hasChainedFunc()? This function should return true on the first call (because func2() is called afterwards), false on the second call.

In a more advanced version, _hasChainedFunc() may also returned the function which is actually called afterwards.

UPDATE

I created a lib which does what I want. It's available on GitHub and I wrote a little documentation here.

In short: Take an arbitrary JavaScript function and "chainify" it:

var Model = function() {};

Model.prototype.func1 = function() {
  console.log('func1 has ' + this.c_getPredecessors().length + ' preceding functions');
  return this.c_delay().c_chain(function() { 
    console.log('func1 has ' + this.c_getSuccessors().length + ' succeeding functions');     
    console.log('func1 processing...');
    this.c_next();
  });
};

Model.prototype.func2 = function() {
  console.log('func2 has ' + this.c_getPredecessors().length + ' preceding functions');
  return this.c_delay().c_chain(function() {
    console.log('func2 has ' + this.c_getSuccessors().length + ' succeeding functions');     
    console.log('func2 processing...');
    this.c_next();
  });
};

Chainify and instantiate it, and call some functions:

chainify(Model);

var Obj = new Model();
Obj.func1().func2();

Console output:

func1 has 0 preceding functions
func2 has 1 preceding functions
func1 has 1 succeeding functions
func1 processing...
func2 has 0 succeeding functions
func2 processing... 

Of course, this is a simple example. It just demonstrates that every functions is now capable to access information about what happens before and after the current function call.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Technically you can never know in advance whether there's another call chained after the current call -- this plainly doesn't make sense because it implies you're aware of some code that's gonna be called before it's called. You can't do this without a pre-compiler, which I guess is not what you're after.

Conversely, it is possible to check whether there's been a previous call chained before the current call. This just requires you to keep some state in the object regarding the previous calls, and update it whenever you call a new function on it. If you only use one chain of calls, you can do this by making func1 and func2 change some state on the this object before returning it.

If you want to call multiple chains on the same object, you face the problem of how to detect the end of a chain. For this you will need to make each chained function return a wrapper around the original this, which would store the state about the previous calls.

If you use the wrapper approach, obj.func1().func2() calls func1 on obj, but func2 is called on a wrapper returned from func1 and this wrapper could be aware of the previous func1 call. If you later call obj.func2().func1() then func2 is now called on obj whereas func1 is called on the wrapper which is aware of the previous func2 call, etc.

share|improve this answer

No, it's not possible.

It's semantically identically to:

var tmp = Obj.func1();
tmp.func2();

When Obj.func1() is called, there's no way for it to know whether the subsequent result will be used to call func2.

The best you could achieve is for func2 to detect whether func1 was previously called, but for it to work the way you've described would require func1 to be capable of predicting the future.

share|improve this answer

What you can do is add a member property indicating if it's the first call made on the object or not:

var Obj = {
   _first : true,

   func1 : function() {
      // some code
      if (this._hasChainedFunc()) {
         // block should be CALLED
      }
      return this;
   },
   func2 : function() {  
      // some code
      if (this._hasChainedFunc()) {
         // block should be NOT called
      }
      return this;
   },
   _hasChainedFunc : function() {
       var isFirst = this._first;
       this._first = false;
       return isFirst;
   }
}

Obj.func1().func2();

However, this means you have to reset the state of the object before each call (by setting this._first back to true). You may want to rethink how you're going about this.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't solve the problem, you are looking up the chain (= looking backward), but I want to look down the chain. –  Scholle Oct 1 '12 at 20:51

here's how i would do this:

var Obj = {
    first:0,   //<--- will store whether it's the first call
    func1 : function() {
            // some code
        if (this._hasChainedFunc()) {
            console.log("called1");
        }
         return this;
    },
    func2 : function() {  
        // some code
        if (this._hasChainedFunc()) {
            console.log("called2");
        }
        return this;
    },
    _hasChainedFunc : function() {
        return (this.first++ > 0);
    }
}

Obj.func1().func2();

and this seems to work:

  called2

http://jsfiddle.net/2VThj/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Same as "rfw"'s solution, you are looking up the chain (= looking backward), but I want to look down the chain. I want to know if func2() gets called afterwards, while I am processing func1(). When "called2" gets printed, func1() has already returned. –  Scholle Oct 1 '12 at 20:54
    
i'm not sure this is possible.. javascript executes Obj.func1() without any knowledge what's gonna happen afterwards. –  Majid L Oct 1 '12 at 21:04

Why would you want to do this?

That question aside, you could, rather than returning the actual object, make a clone of it, and add an attribute to tell you it is a returned version of the object. That is the only way I can think of. Sounds complex though, depending on how complex this object is.

Something like:

func1 : function() {
  // some code
  if (this._hasChainedFunc()) {
     // block should be CALLED
  }
  return deepCloneWithFlag(this);
},
_hasChainedFunc : function() {
   return this.flag;
}
share|improve this answer

Nope. this won't work. you could possibly tell that func1() had at some point been called on this object, but you cannot tell WHEN it was called, i.e. right before func2

for example this:

obj.func1();
obj.func2();

is equivalent to your example call. And there is no way func1 could know that func2 will be called in the future.

I solved a problem similar to this with chain functions (docs) This allows true function chaining with the ability to "look-ahead" to see what's coming in the chain.

share|improve this answer

What you could do is have two separate classes, one for the first element in the chain and one for the remaining elements. Then all you would have to do is change the first class to return an equivalent object from the second class instead of the current object.

var Class1 = function(state){
   return {
       func1 : function() {
           // some code
           // block should be CALLED
           return Class2(state)
       },
       func2 : function() {  
           // some code
           // block should be NOT called
           return Class2(state)     
       }
    };
}


var Class2 = function(state){
   return {
       func1 : function() {
           // some code
           return this;
       },
       func2 : function() {  
           // some code
           return this;
       }
    };
}

Class1(initial_state).func1().func2();
share|improve this answer

Althought knowing that a function will be called after another function is impossible in Javascript, here is a solution to chainify an object :

(function(window, undefined)
{

    var chainify = function(prop)
    {
        return new chainify.init(prop);
    };

    /**
     * 
     * @param prop :
     *            Properties to apply to the object
     * @returns {chainify.init}
     */
    chainify.init = function(prop)
    {
        for ( var key in prop)
            this[key] = prop[key];
    };

    chainify.init.prototype = {

        _attributes : {},

        _chain_in_progress : false,
        _chain_level : 1,
        _chain_function : '',

        /**
         * Returns the chained object
         * 
         * @param name -
         *            name of the previous function
         * @this chainify.init
         * @returns {chainify.init}
         */
        _chain : function(name)
        {
            var tmp = chainify(this);
            tmp._chain_in_progress = true;
            tmp._chain_function = name || '';
            _chain_level++;
            return tmp;
        },

        get : function(key)
        {
            return this._attributes[key];
        },

        set : function(key, value)
        {
            this._attributes[key] = value;
            return this;
        },

        attr : function(prop)
        {
            for ( var key in prop)
                this._attributes[key] = prop[key];
            return this;
        },

    };

    // Make global
    window.chainify = chainify;
})(window);



var myObject = window.chainify({

    // f1() function is using _chain()
    f1 : function(s)
    {
        // Do something
        this.set('s1', s);
        if (this._chain_in_progress) alert('f1 after ' + this._chain_function);

        // return the chain by calling this._chain()
        return this._chain('f1');
    },

    // f2() function is using _chain()
    f2 : function(s)
    {
        this.set('s2', s);
        if (this._chain_in_progress) alert('f2 after ' + this._chain_function);
        return this._chain('f1');
    },

    // that() function is not using _chain(), but we return this so the chaining
    // is not broken
    that : function(s)
    {
        // Do something
        return this;
    }
});


// Check if the f1 function is working
myObject.f1('a'); // Set s1 to "a"
alert(myObject.get('s1')); // should be "a"

// check if the f2 chaining is working
myObject.f1('b').f1('c'); // f1 after f1
alert(myObject.get('s1')); // should be "c" -> changed on last f1 function

// Check if the f2 function is working
myObject.f2('a');
alert(myObject.get('s2')); // should be "a"

// check if the f2 and f1 chaining is working
myObject.f2('b').f1('c').f1('d').f2('e'); // f1 after f2, f1 after f1 ...

alert(myObject.get('s1')); // should be "d" -> changed on last f1 function
alert(myObject.get('s2')); // should be "e" -> changed last f2 function

// check the chain with that() -
myObject.that('b').f1('a').f1('z'); // f1 chained after f1
alert(myObject.get('s1')); // should be "z" -> changed on last f1 function
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.