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I have a question related to the way of using the RequireJs. Our app should grow a lot in the near feature, so the major problem is to prepare a skeleton that would be followed by the developers involved in the project.

we tried this kind of wrapper on RequireJS(trying to enforce the OOP approach):




        //each file will contains such a definition
            //this file should be located under: appNamespace/Client/Widget.js

            //attaching the class definition to the namespace
            with ({public : appNamespace.Client})
            {
               //using a Class defined in the file: appNamespace/DomainModel/DataTable.js
               var dt = using('appNamespace.DomainModel.DataTable');

               //Class definition
               public.Widget = function(iName)
               {
                    //private variable
                    var dSort = new dt.SortableTable();

                    this.Draw = function(iRegion)
                    {
                      //public method implementation           
                    }
               }
            }
    

Or, we could use the natural RequireJS model like structure:

<pre><code>
//this module definition should be located in the file: appNamespace/Client/Widget.js
define('appNamespace/DomainModel/DataTable', function(dt)
{
     function Widget(iName)
     {
        //private variable
        var dSort = new dt.SortableTable();

        this.Draw = function(iRegion)
        {
            //public method implementation           
        }
     }

     return Widget;
})

I would prefer the first example because:

    1. it will enforce developers to write scripts in a more OOP style
    2. it looks like the C# or Java notation - so it will allow a faster switching between the back-end code and the client code
    3. I really don't like the model structure because it allows to write any style of code. More of that, it's not enough to define your class, you should define the API that this file is exposing - so you can actually define an API that has no relation to what that file contains.

So - why would I use the second example - the natural RequireJS model style? Is there anything that I miss?

Any suggestion is welcome

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