Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string called STRING1 that could contain double quotes.

I am echoing the string through sed to pull out puntuation then sending to array to count certain words. The problem is I cannot echo variables through double quotes to sed.

I am crawling our filesystems looking for files that use FTP commands. I grep each file for "FTP"

STRING1=`grep -i ftp $filename`

If you echo $STRING1 this is the output (just one example)

myserver> echo "Your file `basename $1` is too large to e-mail. You must ftp the file to BMC tech support. \c"
    echo "Then, ftp it to ftp.bmc.com with the user name 'anonymous.' \c"
    echo "When the ftp is successful, notify technical support by phone (800-537-1813) or by e-mail (support@bmc.com.)"

Then I have this code

STRING2=`echo $STRING1|sed 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9]/ /g'`

I have tried double quoting $STRING1 like

STRING2=`echo "$STRING1"|sed 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9]/ /g'`

But that does not work. Single Qoutes, just sends $STRING1 as the string to sed...so that did not work.

What else can I do here?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The problem is with how you're setting STRING1 to begin with. If I understand correctly what you're trying to do, you need to write:

STRING1="Your file `basename $1` is too large to e-mail. You must ftp the file to BMC tech support. \c
Then, ftp it to ftp.bmc.com with the user name 'anonymous.' \c
When the ftp is successful, notify technical support by phone (800-537-1813) or by e-mail (support@bmc.com.)"

Then you can write:

STRING2=`echo "$STRING1"|sed 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9]/ /g'`
share|improve this answer
    
I am not manually creating STRING1. STRING1 is created by grep. STRING1=grep -i ftp $filename How can i put "" around that? –  nitrobass24 Oct 1 '12 at 20:29
    
@nitrobass24: Sorry, I don't understand what you're doing. Can you edit your question to include (1) how you're setting STRING1 and (2) the output you get when you type echo "$STRING"? –  ruakh Oct 1 '12 at 20:34
    
Sorry I have edited the OP –  nitrobass24 Oct 1 '12 at 21:35
    
@nitrobass24: Then your second version -- the one with the double-quotes -- works just fine for me. It sets $STRING2 to be just the same as $STRING1, except that all characters except letters, digits, and newlines are replaced with spaces. Are you seeing something different? –  ruakh Oct 1 '12 at 21:43
    
The question is still not clear, but double quotes is what you should be using when echoing a variable. Your problem is elsewhere. –  tripleee Oct 1 '12 at 21:44

Works for me:

/home/user1> S1='"double         quotes"'
/home/user1> echo "$S1"
"double         quotes"

/home/user1> S2=`echo "$S1"|sed 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9]/ /g'` 
/home/user1> echo "$S2"
 double         quotes 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.