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Trying to figure out how to apply a wildcard concept to something while applying where not.

Right now I have $('.zm_name[rel!="'+keyed+'"]').parent().hide(); which will hide everything not exactly matching the keyed value I am looking for, this works fine. However it only works when the keyed value is exact. So I am looking to have it so its like keyed* but anything not equal to the beginning of the string hide.

I tried $('.zm_name[rel^!="'+keyed+'"]').parent().hide(); but only get a syntax error, I browsed through the jquery selectors section of the api, and can't seem to find what I am looking for exactly. So I am wondering is there any actual way of combining this method?

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1  
FYI: For all the selectors visit this page: api.jquery.com/category/selectors – vyx.ca Oct 1 '12 at 20:29
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this

$('.zm_name:not(.zm_name[rel^="'+keyed+'"])').parent().hide();

//OR

$('.zm_name:not([rel^="'+keyed+'"])').parent().hide();​​​​​​​

DEMO

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1  
What do you mean by .zm_name:[rel^="'+keyed+'"]? – Vohuman Oct 1 '12 at 20:29
    
@undefined .. That was a typo .. thanks for pointing it :) – Sushanth -- Oct 1 '12 at 20:34
    
can you elaborate please ? – Sushanth -- Oct 1 '12 at 20:41

I usually stay away from very long selectors because they can be confusing and redundant. Try using the filter method:

$('.zm_name').filter(function(){ 
  return !(new RegExp('^'+ keyed)).test(this.rel); 
});
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe this.rel is a bit faster. – VisioN Oct 1 '12 at 20:38
    
@VisioN: Yup, you're right. – elclanrs Oct 1 '12 at 20:39

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