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From a sample application, they are using slf4j and the scope of the dependancies is runtime.

Is there any perofrmance impact of having this, or is this a one-time hit during application startup?

            <!-- Logging -->
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
            <version>${org.slf4j.version}</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>jcl-over-slf4j</artifactId>
            <version>${org.slf4j.version}</version>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>slf4j-log4j12</artifactId>
            <version>${org.slf4j.version}</version>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>log4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>log4j</artifactId>
            <version>1.2.16</version>
            <scope>runtime</scope>
        </dependency>

I believe there are some memory leaks with spring and log4j, because whenever I use jetty to run my application during development, if it reloads every 10 seconds when there is a change, it eventually gives me a OOM error (permgen?) after a few cycles and I was told this was because of springs logging.

Comments?

share|improve this question
    
because whenever I use jetty to run my application during development, if it reloads every 10 seconds when there is a change this can be disabled, if you weren't aware –  matt b Oct 1 '12 at 20:58
    
wiki.eclipse.org/Jetty/Howto/Prevent_Memory_Leaks - we have worked to address a number of these sorts of things in the latest releases of jetty with the approach described above. Not saying it will solve your issue which is why I am only commenting...but depending on what is going on it might help. –  jesse mcconnell Oct 1 '12 at 21:11
    
@mattb what can be disabled, the reloading if there is a change every x seconds? that's what I want.... –  loyalflow Oct 2 '12 at 13:50
    
Yes. Set scanIntervalSeconds to 0. docs.codehaus.org/display/JETTY/Maven+Jetty+Plugin –  matt b Oct 2 '12 at 14:33

2 Answers 2

I don't think the performance impact is noticable, BUT it depends on how much you are logging, and how much calculation is done for the logging. Therefore embrace logging with lots of calculations with if(logger.isDebugEnabled()) {...}

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Spring uses commons-logging, which will end up sending it's output to log4j with the configuration you currently have.

By adding slf4j, you haven't changed what Spring is using to log internally - but you've added another path for log messages from your own slf4j loggers to take, to log4j.

In reality, this type of thing won't really have any impact (using slf4j in addition to commons-logging, both of which dispatch to log4j) as neither slf4j or commons-logging really does much work on it's own in front of log4j - they basically just send their messages onto log4j for it to send to it's appenders.

(But as always if you are worried about performance - test and measure it!)

share|improve this answer
    
what impact does having a dependancy scope of runtime though? –  loyalflow Oct 2 '12 at 13:51
1  
The scope of dependencies in your Maven pom.xml doesn't really matter for when the application runs. Runtime just means that the library isn't on the compile classpath, but it gets bundled with your war package. So it doesn't matter for "performance impact" if the scope is compile or runtime - in both instances the JAR is bundled in with the WAR - so the question as stated is kind of meaningless. –  matt b Oct 2 '12 at 14:34

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