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I have a project for class were I need to get 4 different strings inputted and then output them in alphabetical order.

So far I have this:

String wd1, wd2, wd3, wd4;
    Scanner scan1 = new Scanner(System.in);

    System.out.println ("Type Word One: ");
    wd1 = scan1.next();

    System.out.println ("Type Word Two: ");
    wd2 = scan1.next();

    System.out.println ("Type Word Three: ");
    wd3 = scan1.next();

    System.out.println ("Type Word Four: ");
    wd4 = scan1.next();

I know that I can get the alphabetical order of 2 strings by using:

int compare = wd1.compareTo(wd2);


    if (compare < 0)
    {System.out.println(wd1 + " " + wd2);}
    else {
        if (compare > 0)
        {System.out.println(wd2+ " " + wd1);}

I need help getting all 4 of the strings in the proper order. I am supposed to be using if else statements and not arrays to do this.

Any help would be great!

Thanks

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2  
Are you allowed to use any sort of data structure to store the strings, like an array or a list? –  Matt Ball Oct 1 '12 at 21:09
    
Look up "sorting networks". It's possible to sort any four inputs using a fixed sequence of five compare-and-swap-if-necessary operations. –  Ian Roberts Oct 1 '12 at 21:33
    
Your newest code is missing {}s. Be sure to use these with every if and every else even if they are not required. This will help you avoid problems like you see now. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 1 '12 at 22:31

6 Answers 6

boolean swapped = false;
do {
  swapped = false;
  if (w2.compareTo(w1) < 0) {
    String tmp = w2;
    w2 = w1;
    w1 = tmp;
    swapped = true;
  }
  if (w3.compareTo(w2) < 0) {
    String tmp = w3;
    w3 = w2;
    w2 = tmp;
    swapped = true;
  }
  if (w4.compareTo(w3) < 0) {
    String tmp = w4;
    w4 = w3;
    w3 = tmp;
    swapped = true;
  }
} while (swapped)

System.out.println(w1);
System.out.println(w2);
System.out.println(w3);
System.out.println(w4);
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How would this be printed to the screen? –  user1695423 Oct 1 '12 at 21:24
    
+1: A solution based on the BubbleSort algorithm. A further explanation would be better for OP to understand what's your code doing. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 1 '12 at 21:24
2  
@user1695423 you just have to print w1, w2, w3 and w4 after this piece of code. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 1 '12 at 21:25

The easiest way to do what you are looking for is to put them in a list, then use list.sort() to put them in order.

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OP says: "I am supposed to be using if else statements and not arrays to do this." This can't be the solution. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 1 '12 at 21:12

How about putting the Strings in a List and call the sort() method?

The Java String class implements the 'Comparable' interface and thus already has the compareTo() method, which should compare the strings in order.

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Read the question one more time. I have edited it to emphasize the "not arrays" fragment. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 1 '12 at 21:15

You need to compare first string with the rest three to find which is alphabetically first. after that you need to compare among the rest 3 and so on.

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Since you are unable to use arrays or any other data structure and a sorting algorithm, you will need to do this manually with several if statements. Before you try to write any code, I suggest you try doing this by hand. If I gave you four words, how would you determine which is the first one in alphabetical order? The second? Keep going; if you can describe how you do this in words, translating into Java should be straight-forward.

Edit:

Don't worry about ASCII code or anything computer related at the moment. I guess you do need to consider the detail that compareTo() only lets you compare two words at a time, though. So let's say you pick wd1 and wd2 to compare. When you compare these two "words", what are the possible outcomes? In each case, what will you do next?

Another Edit:

After discussing in comments, you can see that the algorithm here is something like this (in pseudocode):

if wd1 comes before wd2
    if wd1 comes before wd3
        if wd1 comes before wd4
            print out wd1 // wd1 is the first word in alphabetical order
        else
            print out wd4 // wd4 is the first word in alphabetical order
    else
        // Details left as an exercise to the reader
else
    // Details left as an exercise to the reader

Finish filling in the else statements first in English following the same pattern illustrated here. When you have this finished, writing the code in Java should be pretty simple.

As you can see "understanding the concept" is often not enough to get you started writubg the code. You need to take the time figuring out all the excruciating details. Often I find it helps writing out the steps in English using pen and paper (or maybe a word processor) before I even start writing code. (Of course, you can use your own native language if that's easier. The point is to NOT jump on the computer and start writing Java code from the begginning, especially when you are stuck.)

When you can describe the steps in your native language, then translating into Java becomes easier. Sometimes it is trivial. Other times, you run into a detail that wasn't considered in your natural-language description. Then you back up away from the Java and fix the description before continuing with the Java.

This is basically the process I use when I'm trying to write a computer program. I hope you can adapt some of these ideas to your own coding.

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By hand I would look at a's first then b's, etc. In java I know that each character is represented by a certain integer. It is easy to use the .compareTo for two different words, but I don't understand how you would do it for four words without using do while –  user1695423 Oct 1 '12 at 21:38
    
@user1695423 Okay, I have added a little more of a hint to help you get started. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 1 '12 at 21:45
    
If I do wd1.compareTo(wd2) I will get an integer produced. If it is less than 0 wd1 comes first and if it is greater than 0 word 2 comes first. I am assuming that all the words will be different. –  user1695423 Oct 1 '12 at 21:48
    
@user1695423 Let's back away from the details of the return value and simply talk about it in English. If wd1 comes first, then what will you do next? If instead wd2 comes first, then what next? (Also, it's probably not a good idea to assume that the words will be different. You should figure out what to do in that case as well.) –  Code-Apprentice Oct 1 '12 at 21:52
    
If wd1 comes first I will then move on and compare wd2 with wd3. If wd2 comes first I would compare wd1 with wd3. I kinda understand the concept of what needs to be done but am having trouble putting it into code.( I also don't need to worry about the same word being inputted. I have taken care of that) –  user1695423 Oct 1 '12 at 21:58

Typical divide and concur strategy could be applied. Think about merge sort, sort first 2 and last 2 strings, after that merge results.

if(s2<s1) swap(s1,s2)
if(s4<s3) swap(s3,s4)

if(s1<s3) {
  print(s1)
  if(s2<s3){
    print(s2)
    print(s3)
    print(s4)
  } else {
    print(s3)
    if(s2<s4){
      print(s2)
      print(s4)
    } else {
      print(s4)
      print(s2)
    }
  }
} else {
  print(s3)
  if(s4<s1){
    print(s4)
    print(s1)
    print(s2)
  } else {
    print(s1)
    if(s4<s2){
      print(s4)
      print(s2)
    } else {
      print(s2)
      print(s4)
    }
  }
}
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