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In TypeScript, if I am targeting a browser, how does module loading work? Can I use require.js to load modules? does it have it's own loader?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

TypeScript does not provide a runtime. You need to supply a module loader to use, such as requirejs. A TypeScript module can either be generated to CommonJS convention (for use with node.js) or AMD convention (as used in requirejs); which it generates is a compiler switch.

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That is beyond awesome and exactly what I would hope! Can you point me to documentation on how to use the compiler to generate code for use with require.js? Also...if you are looking for a really wicked case study...converting from js to TypeScript...I'd love to show you some stuff. –  EisenbergEffect Oct 1 '12 at 21:22
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Once installed, type tsc -help. It explains the --module option. –  chuckj Oct 1 '12 at 21:25
    
Thank you again. Great work. Really nice stuff...I appreciate the approach that has been taken. –  EisenbergEffect Oct 1 '12 at 23:21
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@EisenbergEffect! I am smelling like there is another awesome piece of software being written for Web, Like AWESOME caliburn.micro. –  Int3 ὰ Oct 5 '12 at 10:30
    
@EisenbergEffect i would like to see that case study. –  Evan Larsen Oct 9 '12 at 13:11

I have just posted a blog on using require.js with TypeScript.
http://blorkfish.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/typescript-organizing-your-code-with-amd-modules-and-require-js/
Have fun,

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I've looked into this quite a bit and wrote a nice summary of TypeScript modularization techniques worth checking out: http://brettjonesdev.com/modularization-in-typescript/

I'd love to hear other ideas/techniques!

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