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How to find all clusters of forest on map ? I have simple class cell like (Type is enum {RIVER, FOREST,GRASS,HILL}

class Cell{
   public:
     Type type;
     int x;
     int y
};

and map like vector<Cell> grid. Can anyone suggest me algorithm to create list<list<Cell>> clusters where list contains FOREST cells in same cluster (cluster are set of connected cells - connection can be in eight direction:up,down,left,right,up_right,up_left,down_left,down_right)? I need to find all clusters of forest on map and put every single cluster in list<Cell>.

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Define "cluster". Is it any connected set of FOREST cells? Do diagonals count? –  CrazyCasta Oct 1 '12 at 21:14
    
Can you elaborate on this? What are you using it for and how is a cluster defined? Is a cluster simply all elements of type forest that are adjacent to another element of type forest, or something else? –  Marius Brendmoe Oct 1 '12 at 21:15
    
Look up the union-find algorithm. Using path compression, you can just walk through the structure afterwards and create a list for each root, adding your cells to the appropriate list as you go. –  paddy Oct 1 '12 at 21:22

2 Answers 2

The algorithm is rather simple and it actually doesn't even depend on the exact definition of what a cluster is. Say you have a predicate cluster(f0, f1) which yields true if f0 and f1 are in the same cluster. All you need to do is to run though the grid and find a forest. If a cell f is a forest, you check if cluster(f, other) for each known forest. If cluster(f, other) yields true you add f to the cluster of other. You continue to check other known forests in other clusters: when you find another cell c in another cluster for cluster(f, c) also yields true, you merge (std::list<Cell>::spice()) the two clusters.

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I had put this as a comment, but may as well answer:

Look up the union-find algorithm. Using path compression, you can just walk through the structure afterwards and create a list for each root, adding your cells to the appropriate list as you go.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disjoint-set_data_structure

For all your cells, perform a union with the cell above and to the left. If you want diagonals to join, then also include the top-left and top-right diagonal).

Use the path-compression version of union-find so that all nodes in a cluster point to a single root. Then all you have to do is walk through your structure (after doing all the unions) and add nodes as you go. Pseudo(ish)code:

foreach node
    Find(node)               // this ensures path compression

    if not clusters.hasList(node.root)
        clusters.createList(node.root)
    end

    list <- clusters.getList(node.root)
    list.append(node)
end

The above assumes that if a node is a root, then node.root points to node.

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