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Scenario

Parse a string into a nullable numeric type. If the parse is unsuccessful, the result should be null; otherwise the result should be the parsed value.

Question

To accomplish this, I have always used the following simple but lengthily annoying method:

string numericString = "...";

decimal? numericValue;
decimal temp;
if (decimal.TryParse(numericString, out temp))
{
    numericValue = temp;
}
else
{
    numericValue = null;
}

I use the above method because the following doesn't compile:

decimal temp;
decimal? numericValue = decimal.TryParse(numericString, out temp) ? temp : null;

Does anybody know of a version of the first bit of code that is as short, tidy, and readable as the second bit? I know I could always write an extension method that encapsulates the first bit of code, but I'm wondering if there is any way to do what I want without an extension method.

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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One simple explicit typecast makes it compilable:

decimal temp;
// typecast either 'temp' or 'null'
decimal? numericValue =
  decimal.TryParse(numericString, out temp) ? temp : (decimal?)null;

Another option is to use the default operator on the desired nullable type:

decimal temp;
// replace null with default
decimal? numericValue =
  decimal.TryParse(numericString, out temp) ? temp : default(decimal?);
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or ? (decimal?)temp : null; just to add another look. –  Marc Oct 1 '12 at 22:35
2  
I would rather use default(decimal?), I find it more readable than a cast... –  Thomas Levesque Oct 1 '12 at 22:39
    
@Thomas I like that. –  Dan Oct 1 '12 at 22:41
    
@Ondrej if you switch (decimal?)null to default(decimal?), I'll accept this answer. –  Dan Oct 1 '12 at 22:42
    
@Dan, you can change it in your own code anyway, so you might as well accept the answer now... –  Thomas Levesque Oct 1 '12 at 22:44
show 4 more comments

I'd do something like this:

public delegate bool TryParseDelegate<T>(string str, out T value);

public static T? TryParseOrNull<T>(TryParseDelegate<T> parse, string str) where T : struct
{
    T value;
    return parse(str, out value) ? value : (T?)null;
}

decimal? numericValue = TryParseOrNull<decimal>(decimal.TryParse, numericString);

Or you could make it an extension method:

public static T? TryParseAs<T>(this string str, TryParseDelegate<T> parse) where T : struct
{
    T value;
    return parse(str, out value) ? value : (T?)null;
}

decimal? numericValue = numericString.TryParseAs<decimal>(decimal.TryParse);
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+1 for a generic method that could be used for DateTime, bool, int, long, double, etc. –  Dan Oct 1 '12 at 22:45
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How about:

decimal? numericValue = 
    decimal.TryParse(numericString, out temp) ? temp : null as decimal?;

This makes numericValue null if the cast fails, and is nice and clean.

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Just factorize it to an extension method:

public static decimal? ParseDecimal(this string s)
{
    decimal d;
    if (decimal.TryParse(s, out d))
        return d;
    return null;
}

You can then use it like this:

numericValue = numericString.TryParseDecimal();
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The problem is that temp is a decimal and null...is null. Because they are not of the same type, the comparison between the two fails and you get an error.

Try either:

decimal? numericValue = decimal.TryParse(numericString, out temp) ? (decimal?)temp : null;

or

decimal? numericValue = decimal.TryParse(numericString, out temp) ? (decimal?)temp : (decimal?)null;
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I think you should wrap it in a method for better readability:

private decimal? ParseOrDefault(string decimalAsString, decimal? defaultIfInvalidString=null)
{
    decimal result;
    if (decimal.TryParse(decimalAsString, out result))
        return result;
    return defaultIfInvalidString;
}

[Test]
public void ParseOrDefaultTest()
{
    decimal? actual = ParseOrDefault("12", null);
    Assert.AreEqual(12m,actual);

    actual = ParseOrDefault("Invalid string", null);
    Assert.AreEqual(null, actual);
}
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