Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I was wondering why I can't do this.

int main(int argc, char **argv){

    FILE *src;
    char filePath[261];
    filePath = argv[1];

The last line is where there is a compiler error. What's the difference between char[] and char*? How would I fix this code so I can set filePath equal to argv[1]. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Arrays are not assignable values, nor are they pointers. –  Ed S. Oct 1 '12 at 22:54
    
This is the difference between the two: stackoverflow.com/questions/12676402/… –  Mike Oct 1 '12 at 23:21
add comment

4 Answers 4

Use

strcpy(filePath, argv[1]);

and live happy. Don't forget to check argv[1] for being NULL and don't forget to see if argc is > 1.

Your filePath variable is a fixed-size array which is allocated on the stack and argv[i] is a pointer to some memory in the heap. Assigning to filePath cannot be done, because filePath is not a pointer, it is the data itself.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Because filePath is an array and it's not allowed to modify the address of an array in C. You can use the string family to copy the strings.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You need to have:

FILE *src;
char *filePath;
filePath = argv[1];

since filePath must point to argv, not to an array of 261 bytes. If you want, you can copy the argumenti into the array:

FILE *src;
char filePath[261];
strcpy(filePath, argv[1]);

or better, to avoid risking copying more bytes than you have available (which would result in disaster):

FILE *src;
char filePath[261];
strncpy(filePath, argv[1], sizeof(filePath));

or again

#define MAX_FILESIZE    261

FILE *src;
char filePath[MAX_FILESIZE];
strncpy(filePath, argv[1], MAX_FILESIZE);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Q: What's the difference between char[] and char*?

A: Often times, you can use them interchangeably.

But here, you're "attempting to use an array name as an lvalue" :)

Here's a good explanation:

Here's a short summary of "what's legal, and what's not":

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.