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I'm trying to get a div to be assigned a CSS class based on the value of a hidden field that is loaded via ajax.

My code returns the proper value for the hidden field when called, but my div is always assigned the same css class, regardless of the result.

I'm guessing something is wrong with my IF statement syntax:

function doneLoading(){

var colorStatus = $('#colorStatus').val();

if(colorStatus = 'RED'){
    $('.circleFrame').addClass('redState'); 
}

else if(colorStatus = 'GREEN'){
    $('.circleFrame').addClass('greenState');   
}

else if(colorStatus = 'YELLOW'){
    $('.circleFrame').addClass('yellowState');  
}

else {
    alert("Something is broken");
}
}
share|improve this question
    
FYI, check out the switch function....switch(colorStatus){case 'RED': do something; break; case 'GREEN': do something else; break;} –  d-_-b Oct 2 '12 at 0:38
    
We were talking about the switch function (c) in class today. What benefits does it have over the if? –  apttap Oct 3 '12 at 2:05
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're using the assignment operator instead of the comparison operator.

Try

if(colorStatus === 'RED'){
    $('.circleFrame').addClass('redState'); 
}

instead. (And similarly for the other colours.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! What's the difference between == and === ? –  apttap Oct 2 '12 at 0:05
    
Never mind, == is equal to, and === is exactly equal to. –  apttap Oct 2 '12 at 0:06
    
@apttap Yep. More details here: stackoverflow.com/questions/359494/… :) –  Anna Lear Oct 2 '12 at 0:08

It's because you're doing = assignment instead of == comparison. You may want to use http://jshint.com to help locate these sorts of bugs.

Consider the following alternative to shorten your code.

function doneLoading() {
    var color = $('#colorStatus').val().toLowerCase();
    $('.circleFrame').addClass(color + 'State');
}

To maintain the validation, you could do this:

var colors = {green:1, red:1, yellow:1};

function doneLoading() {
    var color = $('#colorStatus').val().toLowerCase();

    if (colors.hasOwnProperty(color))
        $('.circleFrame').addClass(color + 'State');
    else
        alert("Something is broken");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a good way to use classes. –  Gromer Oct 2 '12 at 0:02
    
Yes, this is a lot smarter than what I was doing. Unfortunately I need to keep the states separated from this specific value (other values could cause a change of colorState). Great idea though. –  apttap Oct 2 '12 at 0:15
    
@apttap: Alrighty, but FYI if you need a little validation, you can put this outside the function var colors = {green:1, red:1, yellow:1}; and then before you assign the class, you can do if (colors.hasOwnProperty(color)) { /*change the class*/ } else { /*throw an error*/ } –  I Hate Lazy Oct 2 '12 at 0:33

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