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I'm trying to make a very simple validation for a form input that simply excludes any entries that have a letter in them (basically anything from a-z or A-Z).

This is what I am currently using but this says reject anything that isn't 0-9. which will reject periods, brackets and dashes which I want to validate

var numericReg = /^\d*[0-9](|.\d*[0-9]|,\d*[0-9])?$/;
    if(number != "" && !numericReg.test(number)) {
    return false;

How can I check for letters and reject those inputs instead of rejecting all inputs with non-numerical characters?

Another way to do this would be to only accept inputs that have numbers 0-9, and the following characters: ".", "-", "(", ")"

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What's the problem with only making sure someone inputed a value? Whats to say someone wouldn't type in "Cell: #555-555(5005)" –  Steven Oct 2 '12 at 0:48
    
What if someone types their email address in there by accident? Then my data structure will be all fudged up!! –  Danny Cooper Oct 2 '12 at 0:52
    
What about "1-800-MATTRES"? That's a valid phone number, no? :-D –  lc. Oct 2 '12 at 0:57
    
In this case it's a contact form for a doctor's office so I'm fine with only accepting numerical phone numbers. I understand your arguments guys but validation has its place –  Danny Cooper Oct 2 '12 at 0:59
    
A test for just letters is: var hasAlpha = /[a-z]/i.test(s); –  RobG Oct 2 '12 at 1:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two regular expressions for you to try. The first matches strings that only contain the characters you specified. The second matches strings that contain no letters a-z or A-Z:

var isPhoneChar = /^[-.() \d]+$/;
var isNonAlpha = /^[^a-z]+$/i;

Keep in mind, isNonAlpha won't protect against ñüṃȅɍǒǘṩ ȯẗḥḛṝ ḽëʈťĕřś‼

You may consider also allowing x for phone ex̲tensions and + for international dialing.

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You can always use this for just directly pulling the number out.

CoffeeScript:

console.log number.match ///

  # Match the start of the string.
  ^

  # Get the first 3 digits.
  \(?(?=\d{3})(\d{3})[).\-\s]*

  # Get the next 3 digits.
  (\d{3})[.\-\s]*

  # Get the last 4 digits
  (\d{4})

  # End of the number
  $

///

Javascript (or Node):

console.log(number.match(/^\(?(?=\d{3})(\d{3})[).\-\s]*(\d{3})[.\-\s]*(\d{4})$/));

Here are the test cases I ran in CoffeeScript to make sure it worked:

exports '1234567890'
exports '123 456 7890'

exports '123.456.7890'
exports '123 456.7890'
exports '123.456 7890'
exports '123456.7890'
exports '123.4567890'
exports '123456. 7890'

exports '123-456-7890'
exports '123 456-7890'
exports '123-456 7890'
exports '123456-7890'
exports '123-4567890'

exports '(123)456-7890'
exports '(123)4567890'
exports '(123) 4567890'
exports '(123)456 7890'
exports '(123) 456 7890'
exports '(123) 4567890'

And their output:

1234567890
[ '1234567890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '1234567890' ]
123 456 7890
[ '123 456 7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123 456 7890' ]
123.456.7890
[ '123.456.7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123.456.7890' ]
123 456.7890
[ '123 456.7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123 456.7890' ]
123.456 7890
[ '123.456 7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123.456 7890' ]
123456.7890
[ '123456.7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123456.7890' ]
123.4567890
[ '123.4567890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123.4567890' ]
123456. 7890
[ '123456. 7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123456. 7890' ]
123-456-7890
[ '123-456-7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123-456-7890' ]
123 456-7890
[ '123 456-7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123 456-7890' ]
123-456 7890
[ '123-456 7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123-456 7890' ]
123456-7890
[ '123456-7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123456-7890' ]
123-4567890
[ '123-4567890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '123-4567890' ]
(123)456-7890
[ '(123)456-7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '(123)456-7890' ]
(123)4567890
[ '(123)4567890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '(123)4567890' ]
(123) 4567890
[ '(123) 4567890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '(123) 4567890' ]
(123)456 7890
[ '(123)456 7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '(123)456 7890' ]
(123) 456 7890
[ '(123) 456 7890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '(123) 456 7890' ]
(123) 4567890
[ '(123) 4567890',
  '123',
  '456',
  '7890',
  index: 0,
  input: '(123) 4567890' ]

If number.match returns null with that code, then it's not a valid number. So that's an easy way to check, and then have the number parsed already.

If you ever want to allow a-z, just change all of the \d entries to [\d\w]. (See this)

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