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Just looking for a short overview of GAC for a layman, not a link please.

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7  
Could you elaborate on WHY linked answers like MSDN or Wikipedia aren't adequate for what you want? –  JB King Aug 12 '09 at 19:55
    
Are you reacting perhaps to an error message in some user application? –  Jeff Aug 12 '09 at 19:57
19  
@JB King: I like to hear it in plain terms from someone experienced with .NET rather than a technical specification or an esoteric article. –  Nosrama Aug 12 '09 at 20:05
    
@JB King: In addition to Nosrama's point, StackOverflow obviously allows ratings for each answer which means the clearest and most concise answer naturally floats to the top. –  Dan W Jun 27 '13 at 14:40
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@JB King: Fair point. Btw, even though it was 3 years ago, the question is still just as useful today for people like me who come across this question from Google. –  Dan W Jun 27 '13 at 17:24

8 Answers 8

up vote 62 down vote accepted

Right, so basically it's a way to keep DLLs globally accessible without worrying about conflicts. No more DLL Hell. Each architecture and version gets it's own place to live.

It also gets it own way to browse it in Explorer, so if you go to

C:\Windows\assembly

In windows explorer it lists all the DLLs.

But if you fire up cmd, you can see how it's really structured:

C:\Users\tritter>cd C:\Windows\assembly

C:\Windows\assembly>dir

 Directory of C:\Windows\assembly

07/20/2009  02:18 PM    <DIR>          GAC
06/17/2009  04:22 PM    <DIR>          GAC_32
06/17/2009  04:22 PM    <DIR>          GAC_64
06/17/2009  04:22 PM    <DIR>          GAC_MSIL
 ...snip...
               0 File(s)              0 bytes
               9 Dir(s)  90,538,311,680 bytes free

C:\Windows\assembly>cd GAC_64

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64>dir

 Directory of C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64

06/17/2009  04:22 PM    <DIR>          .
06/17/2009  04:22 PM    <DIR>          ..
01/19/2008  09:54 AM    <DIR>          blbproxy
 ...snip...
01/19/2008  09:54 AM    <DIR>          srmlib
01/19/2008  06:11 AM    <DIR>          System.Data
01/19/2008  06:11 AM    <DIR>          System.Data.OracleClient
 ...snip...
               0 File(s)              0 bytes
              34 Dir(s)  90,538,311,680 bytes free

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64>cd System.Data

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64\System.Data>dir
 Directory of C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64\System.Data

01/19/2008  06:11 AM    <DIR>          .
01/19/2008  06:11 AM    <DIR>          ..
04/11/2009  12:20 PM    <DIR>          2.0.0.0__b77a5c561934e089
               0 File(s)              0 bytes
               3 Dir(s)  90,538,311,680 bytes free

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64\System.Data>cd 2.0.0.0__b77a5c561934e089

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64\System.Data\2.0.0.0__b77a5c561934e089>dir

 Directory of C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64\System.Data\2.0.0.0__b77a5c561934e089

04/11/2009  12:20 PM    <DIR>          .
04/11/2009  12:20 PM    <DIR>          ..
04/11/2009  12:12 PM         3,008,512 System.Data.dll
               1 File(s)      3,008,512 bytes
               2 Dir(s)  90,538,311,680 bytes free

C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_64\System.Data\2.0.0.0__b77a5c561934e089>

Here you can see version 2.0.0.0__b77a5c561934e089 of System.Data.

A DLL is identified by 5 parts:

  1. Name
  2. Version
  3. Architecture
  4. Culture
  5. Public Key

Although the first 3 are generally the big ones.

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5  
You get a +1 for mentioning that it's a new way to have globally reference .dlls while avoiding "dll hell". (It would be an even better answer if you went into a tiny bit of what dll hell is, and how the GAC gets around it...you've got the basic outline of it...but I'd just tighten up the directory structure inset, and add a bit of how the dll is identified and unique) Don't mean to sound too negative...I did give +1! –  Beska Aug 12 '09 at 20:48
    
Just don't provide a link :]. Question about your answer, is the "3. Architecture" specified by the "GAC_64" directory name? And is the Culture in this case blank - the value that would be between the "__" underscores? –  fettereddingoskidney Nov 27 '13 at 18:37

Global Assembly Cache

Each computer where the common language runtime is installed has a machine-wide code cache called the global assembly cache. The global assembly cache stores assemblies specifically designated to be shared by several applications on the computer.

You should share assemblies by installing them into the global assembly cache only when you need to. As a general guideline, keep assembly dependencies private, and locate assemblies in the application directory unless sharing an assembly is explicitly required. In addition, it is not necessary to install assemblies into the global assembly cache to make them accessible to COM interop or unmanaged code.

The things MSDN contains may surprise you... you can usually read it like an article. The straightforward and most important bits at the top, the intricate details deeper down. It certainly explains it better than I could.

Note that Visual Studio displays all the DLLs in the GAC in the .NET tab of the References window. (Right-click on a project in Solution Explorer and select Add Reference.) This should give you a more tangeable idea.

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He said no link, wanted an explanation in your own words. –  user142350 Aug 12 '09 at 19:55
    
He said no links... –  Henk Holterman Aug 12 '09 at 19:55
    
In the original version of his post (I believe he edited it quickly), that was not specified! –  Noldorin Aug 12 '09 at 19:57
5  
Also, MSDN's words are always going to be better and more accurate. :) –  Noldorin Aug 12 '09 at 19:58
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Changed my vote from - to + for the good quote selection. –  user142350 Aug 12 '09 at 20:23

GAC = Global Assembly Cache

Let's break it down:

  • global - applies to the entire machine
  • assembly - what .NET calls its code-libraries (DLLs)
  • cache - a place to store things for faster/common access

So the GAC must be a place to store code libraries so they're accessible to all applications running on the machine.

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Centralized DLL library.

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It's like the COM registry done right, with respect to the physical files as well as their interface and location information. In COM, files were everywhere, with centralised metadata. The GAC centralises the bang shoot.

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GAC (Global Assembly Cache) is where all shared .NET assembly reside see for more details:-Global Assembly Cache

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GAC (Global Assembly Cache) is where all shared .NET assembly reside.

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The Global Assembly Cache (GAC) is a folder in Windows directory to store the .NET assemblies that are specifically designated to be shared by all applications executed on a system. Assemblies can be shared among multiple applications on the machine by registering them in global Assembly cache(GAC). GAC is a machine wide a local cache of assemblies maintained by the .NET Framework.

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