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I have a couple of question regarding onRestoreInstanceState and onSaveInstanceState.

1) where do these methods fit the activity lifecycle? I have read a lot of documentation but there is no clear idea, except a broad statement that when the state of the activity is to be saved

2) Are onCreate and onRestoreInstanceState mutually exclusive?

3) is onRestoreInstanceState called when the activity is destroyed? what does this mean? an activity always destroyed except for scenarios when another activity is floating on top of current.

4) onRestoreInstanceState appears to be called only from instrumentation in jelly bean. Is this no longer relevant to activity lifecycle?

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Additional info: onRestoreInstanceState is not called when activity is created for the first time as you might have guessed – E B Aug 21 '15 at 17:12

where do these methods fit the activity lifecycle?

OnSaveInstanceState is called right before your activity is about to be killed or restarted (e.g b/c of memory pressure or configuration change). Note that this is different from onPause which gets called when your activity loses focus (e.g you transition to another activity).

Usually onSaveInstanceState will be called after onPause but before onStop but not always. E.g if you press back, then the activity is destroyed (like calling finish()) and there is no need to save state so onSaveInstanceState is not called. So why not just save state in onPause? Just because the activity loses focus doesn't mean it has been killed. It is still in memory. Basically you don't want to save state every time you are paused but rather when you are paused and about to become invisible (i.e go from foreground to background).

So what should you do in onPause? Ideally you should release resources that drain your battery e.g network connections, turn off geo or accelerometer, pause a video (all of this depends on your app). And restore these resources in onResume which, as you might have guessed, gets called when your activity gains focus.

Are onCreate and onRestoreInstanceState mutually exclusive?

onRestoreInstanceState is redundant because you can easily restore state in onCreate.

Having said that here is what the official doc says for onRestoreInstanceState:

Most implementations will simply use onCreate(Bundle) to restore their state, but it is sometimes convenient to do it here after all of the initialization has been done or to allow subclasses to decide whether to use your default implementation.

So for best practice, lay out your view hierarchy in onCreate and restore the previous state in onRestoreInstanceState. If you do that, anyone who subclasses your Activity can chose to override your onRestoreInstanceState to augment or replace your restore state logic. This is a long way of saying onRestoreInstanceState serves as a template method.

is onRestoreInstanceState called when the activity is destroyed? what does this mean?

This was partially answered in 1. Yes, onRestore gets called when the system is about to destroy your activity. The system will destroy your activity when it is under memory pressure or the user explicitly closes the application (e.g swipe-delete from recents in nav bar) or there is a configuration change (e.g landspace to portrait).

Why is android designed like this (unlike desktop apps)? Because on mobile systems, resource management is an acute problem b/c of battery life. So you want to provide hooks into app lifecyle so that the app can cleanly save and restore their state between shutdowns or losing focus while at the same time making it totally transparant to the user.

onRestoreInstanceState appears to be called only from instrumentation in jelly bean. Is this no longer relevant to activity lifecycle?

I don't understand this question. Can you rephrase it?

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The documentation says Note that it is important to save persistent data in onPause() instead of onSaveInstanceState(Bundle) because the latter is not part of the lifecycle callbacks, so will not be called in every situation as described in its documentation. – GVillani82 Feb 21 '15 at 2:04
    
@Joseph82 The only thing annoying about that statement in the documentation is that the bundle object savedInstanceState is not passed forcing the app to store the data using other means (sharedPrefs, sqliteDB) – Ryan Jan 11 at 19:05

1) where do these methods fit the activity lifecycle?

from the developer docs.

onSaveInstanceState (Bundle outState)

This method is called before an activity may be killed so that when it comes back some time in the future it can restore its state. For example, if activity B is launched in front of activity A, and at some point activity A is killed to reclaim resources, activity A will have a chance to save the current state of its user interface via this method so that when the user returns to activity A, the state of the user interface can be restored via onCreate(Bundle) or onRestoreInstanceState(Bundle).

The default implementation of onSaveInstanceState() takes care of saving the data related with each n every view that is having an id.

If called, this method will occur before onStop(). There are no guarantees about whether it will occur before or after onPause().

onRestoreInstanceState (Bundle savedInstanceState)

This method is called after onStart() when the activity is being re-initialized from a previously saved state

3) is onRestoreInstanceState called when the activity is destroyed? what does this mean? an activity always destroyed except for scenarios when another activity is floating on top of current.

This method is called after onStart() when the activity is being re-initialized from a previously saved state, given here in savedInstanceState (which is a bundle object containing data saved in onSaveInstanceState(Bundle)).

Most implementations will simply use onCreate(Bundle) to restore their state, but it is sometimes convenient to do it here after all of the initialization has been done or to allow subclasses to decide whether to use your default implementation. The default implementation of this method performs a restore of any view state that had previously been frozen by onSaveInstanceState(Bundle).

4) onRestoreInstanceState appears to be called only from instrumentation in jelly bean. Is this no longer relevant to activity lifecycle?

No. onRestoreInstanceState has been there since API level 1. And its still part of the new Jelly Bean API.

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I have access to all this info from the docs myself. What I am seeing is that in some cases, I am seeing some NPEs which would happen if onCreate/onRestoreInstance are mutually exclusive. So I would trying to reach to a place where I can conclusively determine when these methods are called back – user210504 Oct 2 '12 at 13:11
    
Definitely not mutually exclusive. onCreate is always called during Activity creation. onRestoreInstance is only called if there is an instance to restore. (some ways of exiting an app don't create an instance) – ToolmakerSteve Sep 19 '15 at 10:10
  1. If your activity is getting killed, for example you launched another activity and the system is low on resources it needs to kill your activity, you can use onSaveInstanceState to save the state then restore it.

  2. Not necessarily. onCreate is called before onStart, but onRestoreInstanceState is called after, so it depends on what you are trying to achieve

  3. You mean onSaveInstanceState. Well it is called when the activity is killed as in point 1 above

  4. Sorry ... I don't know, I haven't tried that on Jellybean

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will onCreate be called on all times? because to me onRestoreInstanceState appears to be redundant in every which way then – user210504 Oct 2 '12 at 13:53
    
No. onCreate is called when your app stops or cold starts. They are not redundant, the order of which they are called is different which is very important depending on what you are trying to do (i.e. restoring state of your application). – albattran Oct 3 '12 at 15:20
    
"onCreate is called before onStart, but onRestoreInstanceState is called after" - thanks for pointing that out. BTW, I find the combination of onCreate and onResume to be useful, since both of those run regardless of whether there is a bundle or not. I make all the decisions in onCreate, with info from bundle if it exists, or from other persistent storage I've saved elsewhere, or with default values if first-run. Then onResume does any final steps that can't be done in onCreate. No bundle access in onResume, so rely on onCreate to prep local fields. – ToolmakerSteve Sep 19 '15 at 10:02

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