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In Perl it is possible to instantiate multiple variables like so:

my ($a, $b, $c) = (1,2,3);

It is also possible to reassign multiple variable values the same way:

($a, $b, $c) = (4,5,6);

However, when I try to do the same thing with the plus equals operator,

($a, $b, $c) += (7,8,9);

only $c is properly added and the other variables remain their original value. Is this something that should be possible in Perl, or is it just partially working by accident and it really doesn't work that way? If the latter is true, is there a way to to this in one line?

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Lots of modules in CPAN to do vector math. –  Bill Ruppert Oct 2 '12 at 3:28
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

is it just partially working by accident and it really doesn't work that way?

Yes.

The list operator in scalar context evaluates each of its operands in turn, and returns that to which its last operand evaluates. So you're basically doing the following:

do { $a; $b; $c } += do { 7; 8; 9 };

That's why you're getting the following

Useless use of a constant (7) in void context at -e line 1.
Useless use of a constant (8) in void context at -e line 1.
Useless use of a variable in void context at -e line 1.
Useless use of a variable in void context at -e line 1.

is there a way to to this in one line?

Sure, there are infinitely many. Here are three:

$a += 7; $b += 8; $c += 9;

${$_->[0]} += $_->[1] for [\$a,7],[\$b,8],[\$c,9];

use List::MoreUtils qw( pairwise );
pairwise { $$a += $b; } @{[\$x,\$y,\$z]}, @{[7,8,9]};
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Thanks for explaining what that was actually doing, I was just looking at it on its face and thinking it looked logically correct. –  fishpen0 Oct 2 '12 at 3:36
    
@ikegami : Check that third option. I think it needs to be ($x, $y, $z) = pairwise { $a + $b } @{[$x, $y, $z]}, @{[7, 8, 9]};. Otherwise, you'll either get a modification of a read-only error, or a can't use string ("...") as a reference... error depending on whether or not you're using strict refs. –  DavidO Oct 2 '12 at 3:50
    
@DavidO, no, it works fine save for the reuse of $a,$b,$c, but i don't think that's what you mean. Did you perhaps miss the ref-taking slashes? (Switched to $x,$y,$z) –  ikegami Oct 2 '12 at 4:19
    
No, I copied and pasted, the abc version. Switching to xyz works fine, so your update fixed it. Now if only the maintainers could apply the patch that silences the "used only once" warnings (when warnings are enabled). Good post, btw. –  DavidO Oct 2 '12 at 4:41
    
$a and $b are bad choices for var names in examples 1 and 2 :) –  Zaid Oct 2 '12 at 5:58
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The longhand version of += should work:

($a,$b,$c) = ($a+7,$b+8,$c+9)
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