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I am currently unit testing my code with a mocking library. I am now at the point where I want to test that everything plays nicely with the database and works as expected.

Does it make sense to copy a lot of my unit tests and adjust them to use a test database?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Depends on the tests, we'd need more detail about what they're doing.

However, if you just copy the tests you now have to maintain both copies. Perhaps you can have the same tests run in two modes. One mode uses a mocked infrastructure, the other using real (test) infrastructure. How you accomplish this depends on how you've done the mocking and how your configuration system works.

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1  
Sure, but how do you do it? Do you mock all of your objects, and then change out the mock object for a real one to get some integration testing? The mocks are supposed to be interchangeable with the real thing, after all. Or, do you just forget about adapting your mocked unit tests and write fresh new tests for your integration testing? –  Robert Harvey Oct 2 '12 at 4:19
2  
Personally, I rarely use mock objects. I find the divergence from the real world is not worth the tidiness of having total control over the testing environment. I'd rather build a test fixture within the database and have libraries to create random but fixed data sets. But I mostly write libraries. But when I do mock, yes, the test setup/teardown has a switch to change between the mocks and the reals. However, some things which can be mocked (ex. error conditions) cannot be done with the real infrastructure. –  Schwern Oct 2 '12 at 4:28

Don't copy your tests.

I have done this before to test against different versions of MySQL and SQL Server. One issue I ran into was how MySQL dealt with "case" when naming tables etc when the instance of MySQL Server runs on Windows or UNIX. So the ability to run integration tests against different database engines proves to rather valuable.

I'd recommend the following pattern. Its done using MSTest, however you can adapt it to others. It assumes IMyRepository is an interface that wraps the database logic.

[TestClass]
public abstract class MyTestBase 
{
    protected abstract IMyRepository CreateRepository();

    [TestMethod]
    public void MyTest1()
    {
        // use IMyRepository
        // execute tests
    }
}

[TestClass]
public sealed class MyUnitTest : MyTestBase
{
    protected abstract IMyRepository CreateRepository()
    {
        IMyRepository mockedRepository = /* create a mock */;
    }

    // additional unit tests that are not dependent upon database
}

[TestClass]
public sealed class MyIntegrationTest : MyTestBase
{
    [TestSetup]
    public void TestSetup()
    {
        // configure the database to be pristine
    }

    [TestCleanup]
    public void TestCleanup()
    {
        // dispose of database connections etc.
    }

    protected abstract IMyRepository CreateRepository()
    {
        IMyRepository mockedRepository = /* create real repository */;
    }
}

Another approach would be to only write integration tests for IMyRepository, which in turn uses different database engines. In your business logic tests, you simply mock IMyRepository. There isn't really any value testing business logic twice, provided your business logic simulates database issues and IMyRepository encapsulates database issues appropriately.

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Before doing anything, think about what your goals are. It is easy to go overboard with integration testing and end up with a lot of tests that take a long time to run but don't really provide any value.

With that said, there can be some benefit from taking your highest level unit tests as a template for integration tests (highest meaning furthest from the database). These tests have expectations about the features for that service, so plugging in real dependencies, services and databases gives you a nice test of that slice. It isn't a complete test, but it does make sure that everything works together as expected.

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