Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am encountering a logical error with this app. It is a word jumble app that displays a jumbled word and asks the player if he/she would like to play again once they guess correctly.

When I tell the app I do not want to play again it continues through the sequence anyway. I have a feeling that its bad nesting on my part.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    enum fields {WORD, HINT, NUM_FIELDS};
    const int NUM_WORDS = 5;
    const string WORDS[NUM_WORDS][NUM_FIELDS] =
    {
        {"wall", "Are you banging your head against something?"},
        {"jumble", "Its what this game is all about."},
        {"glasses", "You might need these to read this text."},
        {"labored", "Going slowly, is it?"},
        {"persistent", "Keep at it."},

    };

    srand(static_cast<unsigned int>(time(0)));

    cout << "\t\tWelcome to Word Jumble!\n\n";
    cout << "Unscramble the the letters to make the word!\n";
    cout << "Enter 'hint' for a hint\n";
    cout << "Enter 'quit' to quit the game\n\n";



    const int MAX_LEVEL = NUM_WORDS - 1;
    int totalScore = 0;

    for (int level = 0; level <= MAX_LEVEL; ++level)
    {
        string theWord = WORDS[level][WORD]; // Word to guess
        string theHint = WORDS[level][HINT]; // Word hint
        char playAgain;
        string jumble = theWord; //Jumbled version of the word
        int length = jumble.size();
        int score = jumble.size() * 10;

        for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i)
        {
            int index1 = (rand() % length);
            int index2 = (rand() % length);
            char temp = jumble[index1];
            jumble[index1] = jumble[index2];
            jumble[index2] = temp;
        }

        cout << jumble << endl;

        string guess;
        cout << "\nYour Guess: ";
        cin >> guess;


        while ((guess != theWord) && (guess != "quit"))
        {
            if (guess == "hint")
            {
                cout << theHint;
                score = score / 2;
            }

            else
            {
                cout << "\n\nSorry thats not it.\n\n";
            }

            cout << "\n\nYour Guess: \n\n";
            cin >> guess;

        }

        if (guess == theWord)
        {
            cout << "Thats it! You guessed it!\tYou scored: " << score << "\n\n";

            cout << "Would you like to play again? (y/n): ";
            cin >> playAgain;

            if (playAgain = 'y')
            {
                continue;
            }

            else if (playAgain = 'n')
            {
                cout << "Your total score is: " << totalScore << endl;
                break;
            }

        }



        else if (guess == "quit")
        {
            if (totalScore > 0)
            {
                cout << "Your total score is: " << totalScore << endl;
            }

            break;
        }
    }

    cout << "\nGoodbye.";

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Aside: You can use std::random_shuffle to jumble the letters instead of doing it yourself. – chris Oct 2 '12 at 4:52
    
It helps a lot to enable warnings in your compiler as this kind of bugs is often caught at compile time. – Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 5:38

When comparing playAgain to 'y' and 'n', you only have one equals sign, causing the first one ('y') to always execute instead of it being an actual choice, since the value of 'y' is not 0.

To fix this, they should be:

if (playAgain == 'y') //note ==
{
    continue;
}

else if (playAgain == 'n') //note ==
{
    cout << "Your total score is: " << totalScore << endl;
    break;
}

Also, any sane (more modern) compiler should warn you about this if you have warnings turned on. Be sure to turn those on and take heed of them.

share|improve this answer
    
True. One equal sign is the assignment operator, assigning playAgain the value 'y' instead of creating an argument. I should have spotted this but didn't for some reason. Thanks! – Jammin Oct 2 '12 at 4:56
    
@Jammin, It's always even nicer when you accidentally assign it to 0, causing the condition to be false and never execute, instead of always execute. Then you'd be sitting there scratching your head and wondering why it doesn't seem to hit the continue or the break. – chris Oct 2 '12 at 4:58

I think you will need == for your playAgain question. I often make mistakes with that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.