Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm running into a mild conundrum concerning thread safety for my game loop. What I have below is 3 threads (including the main) that are meant to work together. One for event managing (main thread), one for logic, and one for the rendering. All 3 of these threads exist within their own class, as you can see below. In basic testing the structure works without problems. This system uses SFML and renders with OpenGL.

int main(){
    Gamestate gs;
    EventManager em(&gs);
    LogicManager lm(&gs);
    Renderer renderer(&gs);

    lm.start();
    renderer.start();
    em.eventLoop();

    return 0;
}

However, as you may have noticed I have a "Gamestate" class that is meant to act as a container of all the resources that need to be shared between the threads (mostly with LogicManager as a writer and Renderer as a reader. EventManager is mostly just for window events). My questions are: (1 and 2 being the most important)

1) Is this a good way of going about things? Meaning is having a "global" Gamestate class a good idea to use? Is there a better way of going about it?

2) My intention was to have Gamestate have mutexes in the getters/setters, except that doesn't work for reading because I can't return the object while it's still locked, which means I'd have to put synchronization outside of the getters/setters and make the mutexes public. It also means I'd have a bloody ton of mutexes for all the different resources. What is the most elegant way of going about this problem?

3) I have all of the threads accessing "bool run" to check if to continue their loops

while(gs->run){
....
}

run gets set to false if I receive a quit message in the EventManager. Do I need to synchronize that variable at all? Would I set it to volatile?

4) Does constantly dereferencing pointers and such have an impact on performance? eg gs->objects->entitylist.at(2)->move(); Do all those '->' and '.' cause any major slowdown?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Global state

1) Is this a good way of going about things? Meaning is having a "global" Gamestate class a good idea to use? Is there a better way of going about it?

For a game, as opposed to some reusable piece of code, I'd say a global state is good enough. You might even avoid passing gamestate pointers around, and really make it a global variable instead.

Synchronization

2) My intention was to have Gamestate have mutexes in the getters/setters, except that doesn't work for reading because I can't return the object while it's still locked, which means I'd have to put synchronization outside of the getters/setters and make the mutexes public. It also means I'd have a bloody ton of mutexes for all the different resources. What is the most elegant way of going about this problem?

I'd try to think of this in terms of transactions. Wrapping every single state change into its own mutex locking code will not only impact performance, but might lead to actually incorrect behaviour if the code gets one state element, performs some computation on it and sets the value later on, while some other code modified the same element in between. So I'd try to structure LogicManager and Renderer in such ways that all the interaction with the Gamestate occurs bundled in a few places. For the duration of that interaction, the thread should hold a mutex on the state.

If you want to enforce the use of mutexes, then you can create some construct where you have at least two classes. Let's call them GameStateData and GameStateAccess. GameStateData would contain all the state, but without providing public access to it. GameStateAccess would be a friend of GameStateData and provide access to its private data. The constructor of GameStateAccess would take a reference or pointer to the GameStateData and would lock the mutex for that data. The destructor would free the mutex. That way, your code to manipulate the state would simply be written as a block where a GameStateAccess object is in scope.

There is still a loophole, though: In cases where objects returned from this GameStateAccess class are pointers or references to mutable objects, then this setup won't keep your code from carrying such a pointer out of the scope protected by the mutex. To prevent this, either take care about how you write things, or use some custom pointer-like template class which can be cleared once the GameStateAccess goes out of scope, or make sure you only pass things by value not reference.

Example

Using C++11, the above idea for lock management could be implemented as follows:

class GameStateData {
private:
  std::mutex _mtx;
  int _val;
  friend class GameStateAccess;
};
GameStateData global_state;

class GameStateAccess {
private:
  GameStateData& _data;
  std::lock_guard<std::mutex> _lock;
public:
  GameStateAccess(GameStateData& data)
    : _data(data), _lock(data._mtx) {}
  int getValue() const { return _data._val; }
  void setValue(int val) { _data._val = val; }
};

void LogicManager::performStateUpdate {
  int valueIncrement = computeValueIncrement(); // No lock for this computation
  { GameStateAccess gs(global_state); // Lock will be held during this scope
    int oldValue = gs.getValue();
    int newValue = oldValue + valueIncrement;
    gs.setValue(newValue); // still in the same transaction
  } // free lock on global state
  cleanup(); // No lock held here either
}

Loop termination indicator

3) I have all of the threads accessing "bool run" to check if to continue their loops

while(gs->run){
....
}

run gets set to false if I receive a quit message in the EventManager. Do I need to synchronize that variable at all? Would I set it to volatile?

For this application, a volatile but otherwise unsynchronized variable should be fine. You have to declare it volatile in order to prevent the compiler from generating code which caches that value, thus hiding a modification by another thread.

As an alternative, you might want to use a std::atomic variable for this.

Pointer indirection overhead

4) Does constantly dereferencing pointers and such have an impact on performance? eg gs->objects->entitylist.at(2)->move(); Do all those -> and . cause any major slowdown?

It depends on the alternatives. In many cases, the compiler will be able to keep the value of e.g. gs->objects->entitylist.at(2) in the above code, if it is used repeatedly, and won't have to compute it over and over again. In general I would consider the performance penalty due to all this pointer indirection to be of minor concern, but that is hard to tell for sure.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. As for 2), could you please give me a code snippet example? –  Zeke Oct 2 '12 at 6:53
    
@Zeke, I've added an example. –  MvG Oct 2 '12 at 7:50

Is it a good way of going about things? (class Gamestate)

1) Is this a good way of going about things?

Yes.

Meaning is having a "global" Gamestate class a good idea to use?

Yes, if the getter/setter are thread-safe.

Is there a better way of going about it?

No. The data is necessary for both game logic and representation. You could remove the global gamestate if you put it in a sub-routine, but this would only transport your problem to another function. A global Gamestate will also enable you to safe the current state very easily.

Mutex and getters/setters

2) My intention was to have Gamestate have mutexes in the getters/setters [...]. What is the most elegant way of going about this problem?

This is called reader/writer problem. You don't need public mutexes for this. Just keep in mind that you can have many readers, but only one writer. You could implement a queue for the readers/writers and block additional readers until the writer has finished.

while(gs->run)

Do I need to synchronize that variable at all?

Whenever a non-synchronized access of a variable could result in a unknown state, it should be synchronized. So if run will be set to false immediately after the rendering engine started the next iteration and the Gamestate has been destroyed, it will result in a mess. However, if the gs->run is only an indicator whether the loop should continue, it is safe.

Keep in mind that both logic and rendering engine should be stopped at the same time. If you can't shutdown both at the same time stop the rendering engine first in order to prevent a freeze.

Dereferencing pointers

4) Does constantly dereferencing pointers and such have an impact on performance?

There are two rules of optimization:

  1. Do not optimize
  2. Do not optimize yet.

The compiler will probably take care of this problem. You, as a programmer, should use the version which is most readable for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you give me a code snippet for 2), or a link to a resource that handles that matter please? –  Zeke Oct 2 '12 at 6:54
    
@Zeke: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Readers-writers_problem –  Zeta Oct 2 '12 at 6:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.