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I have a dataset that contains observations for every second of four consecutive days (roughly 340'000 data points). This is too much to display in a scatter plot. I would like to plot only a uniform sample of, say, 2000 time points.

Is it possible to achieve this with ggplot2's "grammar of graphics" approach? I haven't found any built-in "sampling" modifier, but perhaps it's easy enough to write one?

library(ggplot2)

x <- 1:100000
d <- data.frame(x=x, y=rnorm(length(x)))
ggplot(d[sample(x, 2000), ], aes(x=x, y=y)) + geom_point()

This is how it can be "hacked" by modifying the data passed to ggplot. But I don't want to modify the data, just filter it to include only a sample.

ggplot(d, aes(x=x, y=y)) + ??? + geom_point()

EDIT: I'm specifically looking for sampling, not smoothing or binning. The data I have shows the time it takes to simulate one second of a specific process. The simulation has been parallelized, and for each simulated seconds I have the run times for each of the cores involved (8 in total). I want to show sub-optimal load balancing by plotting just the raw data points. The reason for the sampling is just that 300'000 data points are way too much for a scatter plot: Plotting takes too long and the visualization is no good.

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you've got to sample your data at some point AFAIK and the solution you posted seemed to do that quite efficiently. That approach will be faster and take less memory than any additional geom/transformation of the data that ggplot would implement. –  Chase Oct 2 '12 at 5:34
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I would not call plotting a subset of the data by plotting a subset of the data hacking. –  mnel Oct 2 '12 at 5:35
    
@mnel: I do. This is against the beauty of the ggplot2 syntax. Data goes into ggplot unmodified, period. Everything else is visualization. –  krlmlr Oct 2 '12 at 5:57
    
@Chase: The code would be simpler, and I'd be able to do the sampling at a later stage in the construction of the ggplot object. (In fact, I'm doing something along the lines of ggplot(...) + theme_bw() + ylim(...) + aes(...), and I'd have to repeat everything if sampling happens in the ggplot call.) –  krlmlr Oct 2 '12 at 5:59
    
You probably want more sampling in more complicated parts of the data, and less in the more "linear" parts. But it depends on what you are trying to show. geom_smooth, geom_density or geom_hex might help you display the essence of your data more parsimoniously. –  James Oct 2 '12 at 6:31
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can subset with in the geom_point call using the data argument:

... + geom_point(data=d[sample(x,2000),])

This way, you are free to add other geoms using all the data, eg, using the example data:

ggplot(d, aes(x=x, y=y)) + geom_hex() + geom_point(data=d[sample(x,2000),])

hexbin and sampled points

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Another way to change the "active" dataset is to use the %+% operator: ggplot() %+% d[sample(...),] + ... –  krlmlr Oct 5 '12 at 7:46
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If you want create a scatter plot for big data here are a couple of ggplot2 options

They come from This course by hadley

# upload all images to imgur.com
opts_chunk$set(fig.width = 5, fig.height = 5, dev = "png")
render_markdown(strict = T)


# some autocorrelated data
set.seed(1)
x <- 1:1e+05
d <- data.frame(x = x)
d$y <- arima.sim(list(order = c(1, 1, 0), ar = 0.9), n = 1e+05 - 1)
# the basic plot 
base_plot <- ggplot(d, aes(x = x, y = y))

geom_bin2d

you can set the binwidth for the x and y variables

base_plot + geom_bin2d(binwidth = c(200, 5))

enter image description here

geom_hex

you can set the number of bins

base_plot + geom_hex(bins = 200)

enter image description here

small points

Stops overplotting

base_plot + geom_point(size = I("."))

enter image description here

use a smoother

This relies on having a smoothing method that will get you the detail you want without crashing or taking too long. In this case the number of knots was chosen by trial and error (and perhaps you will want more detail)

library(mgcv)
base_plot + stat_smooth(method = "gam", formula = y ~ s(x, k = 50))

enter image description here

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The example I have provided pretty much captures what the data is like. Of course, there is a general trend, and I'll do some binning or smoothing later on; but first I want to plot the raw data. –  krlmlr Oct 2 '12 at 7:02
    
base_plot + geom_point(size = I(".")) plots the raw data –  mnel Oct 2 '12 at 7:07
    
But it's too much data! Is there no way to get a sample (other than filddling with the data)? –  krlmlr Oct 2 '12 at 7:09
    
If you want to plot a subset of the data, then plot a subset of the data! In ths case you aren't plotting the raw data It is better to be explicit about such things. It is also extremely valid and normal ggplot usage to modify your data outside the ggplot call to make visualization easier. –  mnel Oct 2 '12 at 7:23
    
Repeating a comment addressed to Chase: The code would be simpler, and I'd be able to do the sampling at a later stage in the construction of the ggplot object. (In fact, I'm doing something along the lines of ggplot(...) + theme_bw() + ylim(...) + aes(...), and I'd have to repeat everything if sampling happens in the ggplot() call.) –  krlmlr Oct 2 '12 at 7:30
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