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I have a two threads, one which works in a tight loop, and the other which occasionally needs to perform a synchronization with the first:

// thread 1
while(1)
{
    lock(work);
    // perform work
    unlock(work);
}

// thread 2
while(1)
{
    // unrelated work that takes a while
    lock(work);
    // synchronizing step
    unlock(work);
}

My intention is that thread 2 can, by taking the lock, effectively pause thread 1 and perform the necessary synchronization. Thread 1 can also offer to pause, by unlocking, and if thread 2 is not waiting on lock, re-lock and return to work.

The problem I have encountered is that mutexes are not fair, so thread 1 quickly re-locks the mutex and starves thread 2. I have attempted to use pthread_yield, and so far it seems to run okay, but I am not sure it will work for all systems / number of cores. Is there a way to guarantee that thread 1 will always yield to thread 2, even on multi-core systems?

What is the most effective way of handling this synchronization process?

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What you have described in your question has no relation to fairness, If you want Thread 2 to be with higher priority then thread 1, one of the ways to achieve it , by using condition variables. –  Michael Oct 2 '12 at 6:46
    
This question is very similar to Fair critical section (Linux). –  caf Oct 2 '12 at 7:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can build a FIFO "ticket lock" on top of pthreads mutexes, along these lines:

#include <pthread.h>

typedef struct ticket_lock {
    pthread_cond_t cond;
    pthread_mutex_t mutex;
    unsigned long queue_head, queue_tail;
} ticket_lock_t;

#define TICKET_LOCK_INITIALIZER { PTHREAD_COND_INITIALIZER, PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER }

void ticket_lock(ticket_lock_t *ticket)
{
    unsigned long queue_me;

    pthread_mutex_lock(&ticket->mutex);
    queue_me = ticket->queue_tail++;
    while (queue_me != ticket->queue_head)
    {
        pthread_cond_wait(&ticket->cond, &ticket->mutex);
    }
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&ticket->mutex);
}

void ticket_unlock(ticket_lock_t *ticket)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&ticket->mutex);
    ticket->queue_head++;
    pthread_cond_broadcast(&ticket->cond);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&ticket->mutex);
}

Under this kind of scheme, no low-level pthreads mutex is held while a thread is within the ticketlock protected critical section, allowing other threads to join the queue.

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In your case it is better to use condition variable to notify second thread when it is required to awake and perform all required operations.

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1  
Please also mention semaphores as a potential solution to problems like these, they are often overlooked! –  Marius Brendmoe Oct 2 '12 at 6:56
    
Any example or snippet about how semaphores can be used to this problem? –  Atanu Oct 2 '12 at 6:57
    
This answer of mine might be useful, where I show how to use pthreads condition variables to implement a first-in-first-out ticket lock. –  caf Oct 2 '12 at 6:59
    
@caf Your answer was exactly what I was looking for. You should post it here so I can accept it. If Sergey can complete his answer with including how to use condition variables in this case, I can consider it as well. –  scientiaesthete Oct 3 '12 at 4:16
    
@scientiaesthete the question provides a small amount of information to understand whole design of your system. My common advice is to take a look on Monitor object en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monitor_%28synchronization%29 , cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/PDF/monitor.pdf and review also a list concurrency patterns en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concurrency_pattern to understand which is better for your needs. –  Sergey Oct 3 '12 at 6:41

pthread offers a notion of thread priority in its API. When two threads are competing over a mutex, the scheduling policy determines which one will get it. The function pthread_attr_setschedpolicy lets you set that, and pthread_attr_getschedpolicy permits retrieving the information.

Now the bad news:

  • When only two threads are locking / unlocking a mutex, I can’t see any sort of competition, the first who runs the atomic instruction takes it, the other blocks. I am not sure whether this attribute applies here.
  • The function can take different parameters (SCHED_FIFO, SCHED_RR, SCHED_OTHER and SCHED_SPORADIC), but in this question, it has been answered that only SCHED_OTHER was supported on linux)

So I would give it a shot if I were you, but not expect too much. pthread_yield seems more promising to me. More information available here.

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Ticket lock above looks like the best. However, to insure your pthread_yield works, you could have a bool waiting, which is set and reset by thread2. thread1 yields as long as bool waiting is set.

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