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ArrayList<Fix> fixList = new ArrayList<Fix>();
StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(idlist, ",");
int index = 0;
while(st.hasMoreElements()) {
    Long id = Long.parseLong(st.nextElement().toString());          
    fixList.add(index++,fixManager.getFixById(id));
}

Arraylist here is able to take only one element. I debugged it, it takes only single element but count shows two or more elements are there in arraylist.

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You don't add multiple element in ArrayList like that.. You could use a HashMap for what you want to achieve.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 2 '12 at 6:17
    
Please write input and output for the same –  Bhavik Ambani Oct 2 '12 at 6:18
    
Just use fixList.add(fixManager.getFixById(id)); –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 2 '12 at 6:19
    
While debugging, are you looking at the internal array inside the ArrayList ? If so, that is preallocated with a length of 10 if you use the default constructor. Look at the size property to see how many elements are actually stored. –  Costi Ciudatu Oct 2 '12 at 6:22
    
"it takes only single element but count shows two...". What is count ? –  Costi Ciudatu Oct 2 '12 at 6:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Are you sure that the fixManager returns objects for each call? If you try to add null, ArrayList does not complains.

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Thanks....it was returning the null –  user1671219 Oct 2 '12 at 7:46

Use HashMap for any kind of mapping you want..

Map<Integer, Fix> fixList = new HashMap<Integer, Fix>();
StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(idlist, ",");
int index = 0;
while(st.hasMoreElements()) {
    Long id = Long.parseLong(st.nextElement().toString());          
    fixList.put(index++,fixManager.getFixById(id));
}

Or if you have id inside your Fix object.. You can simply add 2nd element to your list.. You don't need to have an index for accessing them..

fixList.add(fixManager.getFixById(id));
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why not just add the element, without defining the index?

fixList.add(fixManager.getFixById(id));

check out http://javafiddle.net/jqPDma

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The effect is the same, so this couldn't be the actual problem, could it ? –  Costi Ciudatu Oct 2 '12 at 6:20
    
@CostiCiudatu if the effect were the same, then the problem is in fixManager.getFixById(id). –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 2 '12 at 6:21
    
...or StringTokenizer has only one token –  sics Oct 2 '12 at 6:22

Your syntax is correct but your method

fixManager.getFixById(id)

inside loop is returning only one element based on that Id.

you can see, it by debugging the getFixById(id) inside your fixManager.

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I tried the following code

ArrayList <Integer> x = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    for(int i=0;i<15;i++)
    {
        x.add(i);
        x.add(i);

    }

    for(int i=0;i < x.size();i++)
    {
        System.out.println(x.get(i));
    }

and it works fine. so I think sou should check your getFixbyID() function. I doubt whether it is returning new Fix type object in each call.

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