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Here's my script:

#!/bin/bash


for i in *.csv
do
        echo "i: $i"
        THE_FILE2="$i-2.csv"

        file_read()
        {
                lineno=0
                while read line
                do
                        echo $line | awk -F, '{print $1","$2",,,"$3","$4}'
                        ((lineno++))
                done
        } < $i > $THE_FILE2
        echo "the_file2: $THE_FILE2"
        echo "end"
done

file_read

Output:

i: 2992.csv
the_file2: 2992.csv-2.csv
end
i: 5415.csv
the_file2: 5415.csv-2.csv
end
i: csa.csv
the_file2: csa.csv-2.csv
end
i: loc.csv
the_file2: loc.csv-2.csv
end
i: visa.csv
the_file2: visa.csv-2.csv
end

$ ls
2992.csv       csa.csv        transform.sh   visa.csv-2.csv
5415.csv       loc.csv        visa.csv

Unfortunately, it only does it for the last file in the list. It's skipping over all the others. I have a feeling this has something to do with buffering or globbing or something. What am I missing?

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1  
Why are you reading the file line by line in your script? Awk does it by default for you. awk -F, '{print $1","$2",,,"$3","$4}' $i > $THE_FILE2 does what you want probably (untested) –  Bernhard Oct 2 '12 at 6:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have defined file_read inside the loop then called it from outside.

It should be the other way around!

You'll may want to pass some of the values through to file_read as parameters.

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1  
I would get rid of the function altogether in this case. –  Bernhard Oct 2 '12 at 6:54
    
In the example given above, that is probably a good solution - it's small enough that it can remain inline without confusing the code too much. –  John3136 Oct 2 '12 at 6:57

There's no need for the file_read function. Just put that code directly in the for-loop.

Also, why do you use the shell's read command and then echo that to a new awk command for each line? You can just redirect the entire file to awk, it reads each line automatically.

And you're incrementing lineno, but not using it for anything. If you need the line number for something you haven't shown, you can use awk's NR variable.

for i in *.csv
do
        echo "i: $i"
        THE_FILE2="$i-2.csv"
        awk -F, '{print $1","$2",,,"$3","$4}' < $i > $THE_FILE2
        echo "the_file2: $THE_FILE2"
        echo "end"
done
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Unfortunately, it only does it for the last file in the list.

That's because you are only calling file_read once, after the loop. It only executes it for the last file because the variables i and THE_FILE2 remain from the last iteration of the loop.

Here is an awk solution:

awk -f - *.csv << 'EOD'
BEGIN { OFS = FS = "," }
{
    out = FILENAME "-2.csv"
    print $1,$2,",",$3,$4 >> out
}
EOD
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