Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i am having a macro whose definition runs into around 50 lines and has lot of 'if else' statements. This macro def'n appears in a .h file. I am running 'gdb in TUI mode', but when the execution reaches that macro, the code window goes blank and returns back only after the macro code gets executed. I want to see line by line execution of the full macro code. Please let me know how can that be done (one way is to replace the macro with its definition in the code and then recompile it. i don't want to use this option as there are several such macros in my code).

Any help will be greatly appreciated. looking forward to get the solution for this problem. Please let me know if there is some other way for this issue rather than the usage of preprocessed file ? i am having a code which runs into several hundred .c & .h files.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

"One does not simply step into macros."

You still have a few options:

  1. Use the preprocessor, as @WhozCraig recommended.
  2. For a little less code bloat, convert your macros to functions and re-compile.
  3. If you absolutely don't want to recompile and you're comfortable with assembly code you can use stepi to execute your macro one machine instruction at a time.
share|improve this answer
    
I'd go for #3 were it I before I take my own advice and start pouring through 20,000 lines of preprocessed source, but I'm comfortable on the business-end of a disassembler. Maybe the OP is too. –  WhozCraig Oct 2 '12 at 8:01
add comment

One option is to fully preprocess your C file, expanding all macros in it, and then compile the resulting preprocessed file.

For example, consider this simple C program:

// file: prep.c
#include <stdio.h>

#define MY_BIG_MACRO \
  int i; \
  printf("integers from 0 to 9:\n"); \
  for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) \
    printf("%d ", i); \
  printf("\n");

int main(void)
{
  MY_BIG_MACRO
  return 0;
}

Compile it, saving the temporary files (including the preprocessed source code):

gcc -Wall -O2 -g -std=c99 prep.c -o prep.exe -save-temps

This should give you a preprocessed version of prep.c, prep.i (shortened for brevity):

# 1 "prep.c"
# 1 "C:\\MinGW\\msys\\1.0\\home\\Alex//"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "prep.c"

# 1 "c:\\mingw\\bin\\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.6.2/../../../../include/stdio.h" 1 3

...

int __attribute__((__cdecl__)) __attribute__ ((__nothrow__)) vswscanf (const wchar_t * __restrict__,
         const wchar_t * __restrict__, __gnuc_va_list);
# 3 "prep.c" 2
# 11 "prep.c"
int main(void)
{
  int i; printf("integers from 0 to 9:\n"); for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) printf("%d ", i); printf("\n");
  return 0;
}

Now you want to get rid of the #-lines. One way or another, if they are left in, they will affect the debug info. Surprisingly, that means that the macro won't appear expanded in gdb.

Thankfully, grep can help (I'm not a grep pro, so check whether the params are correct, but they seem to work for me on Windows with MinGW x86):

grep ^[^\#].*$ prep.i > prepi.c

This will give you a stripped version of prep.i in prepi.c:

typedef unsigned int size_t;
typedef short unsigned int wchar_t;
typedef short unsigned int wint_t;

...

int __attribute__((__cdecl__)) __attribute__ ((__nothrow__)) vswscanf (const wchar_t * __restrict__,
         const wchar_t * __restrict__, __gnuc_va_list);
int main(void)
{
  int i; printf("integers from 0 to 9:\n"); for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) printf("%d ", i); printf("\n");
  return 0;
}

Now you can compile it:

gcc -Wall -O2 -g -std=c99 prepi.c -o prepi.exe

And run it in gdb:

gdb prepi.exe

Issue the following commands:

b main
r
l

This will execute the app until main() and list the source code related to the reached breakpoint:

(gdb) b main
Breakpoint 1 at 0x40643f: file prepi.c, line 184.
(gdb) r
Starting program: C:\MinGW\msys\1.0\home\Alex\prepi.exe
[New Thread 7340.0x20c4]

Breakpoint 1, main () at prepi.c:184
184       int i; printf("integers from 0 to 9:\n"); for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) pri
ntf("%d ", i); printf("\n");
(gdb) l
179              const wchar_t * __restrict__, __gnuc_va_list);
180     int __attribute__((__cdecl__)) __attribute__ ((__nothrow__)) vswscanf (c
onst wchar_t * __restrict__,
181              const wchar_t * __restrict__, __gnuc_va_list);
182     int main(void)
183     {
184       int i; printf("integers from 0 to 9:\n"); for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) pri
ntf("%d ", i); printf("\n");
185       return 0;
186     }
(gdb)

As you can see, the macro body is now in the plain view.

One small problem here is that multi-line macros (those continued with \) are expanded into a single line. I haven't found an option to expand them into multiple lines, but you can do that manually.

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter care to explain what exactly is wrong in my answer? I could learn a thing or two from such an explanation. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 8:17
    
thanks for your time and answer. is there some other way for the issue rather than the usage of preprocessed file ? i am having a code which runs into several hundred .c & .h files. –  user1182722 Oct 2 '12 at 8:17
    
I'm not aware of another way, although there might be (either with gcc/gdb or with another toolset). Sorry. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 2 '12 at 8:19
add comment

If all the above does not work, really you should go back to using printf/fprintf within your large macro.

I had to deal with a 300 lines MACRO, burried deep into the library. This was easier than compiling by hand and dealing with post-processed files.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.