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I would like to know, in general, performance comparison executing a stored procedure that execute a statement with a syntax as

BEGIN

    DECLARE query VARCHAR(5000);
    SET @query = " <SQL CODE>";

    PREPARE stmt1 FROM @query;
    EXECUTE stmt1;
    DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt1;

END

or executing directly AS

BEGIN

    <SQL CODE>;

END

in my case i must use first case because i want to set a input parameter to set custom LIMIT. And I wondered if, in general, there could be some performance degradation.

MySQL Information

  • protocol_version 10
  • version 5.0.95
  • version_bdb Sleepycat Software: Berkeley DB 4.1.24: (December 16, 2011)
  • version_comment Source
  • distribution version_compile_machine x86_64
  • version_compile_os redhat-linux-gnu
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What is the MySQL version? –  Devart Oct 2 '12 at 8:39
    
protocol_version 10 version 5.0.95 version_bdb Sleepycat Software: Berkeley DB 4.1.24: (December 16, 2011) version_comment Source distribution version_compile_machine x86_64 version_compile_os redhat-linux-gnu –  Luigi Saggese Oct 2 '12 at 8:42
1  
I just wanted to say that you could use variables in LIMIT clause directly in MySQL 5.5. From the documentation: Within stored programs, LIMIT parameters can be specified using integer-valued routine parameters or local variables as of MySQL 5.5.6. –  Devart Oct 2 '12 at 8:48
1  
cool i'll do it! but in general what you think about performance beetween statement execution or sql execution? –  Luigi Saggese Oct 2 '12 at 8:54
1  
as with all things there are pros and cons –  Luigi Saggese Oct 2 '12 at 9:56

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