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I am designing a class that stores (caches) a set of data. I want to lookup a value, if the class contains the value then use it and modify a property of the class. I am concerned about the design of the public interface.
Here is how the class is going to be used:

ClassItem *pClassItem = myClass.Lookup(value);
if (pClassItem)
{ // item is found in class so modify and use it 
  pClassItem->SetAttribute(something);
  ... // use myClass
}
else
{  // value doesn't exist in the class so add it
  myClass.Add(value, something); 
}

However I don't want to have to expose ClassItem to this client (ClassItem is an implementation detail of MyClass). To get round that the following could be considered:

bool found = myClass.Lookup(value);
if (found)
{ // item is found in class so modify and use it 
  myClass.ModifyAttribute(value, something);
  ... // use myClass
}
else
{  // value doesn't exist in the class so add it
  myClass.Add(value, something); 
}

However this is inefficient as Modify will have to do the lookup again. This would suggest a lookupAndModify type of method:

bool found = myClass.LookupAndModify(value, something);
if (found)
{ // item is found in class
  ... // use myClass
}
else
{  // value doesn't exist in the class so add it
  myClass.Add(value, something); 
}

But rolling LookupAndModify into one method seems like very poor design. It also only modifies if value is found and so the name is not only cumbersome but misleading as well.

Is there another better design that gets round this issue? Any design patterns for this (I couldn't find anything through google)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Two things.

The first solution is close.

Don't however, return ClassItem *. Return an "opaque object". An integer index or other hash code that's opaque (meaningless) to the client, but usable by the myClass instance.

Then lookup returns an index, which modify can subsequently use.

void *index = myClass.lookup( value );
if( index ) {
    myClass.modify( index, value );
}
else {
    myClass.add( value );
}

After writing the "primitive" Lookup, Modify and Add, then write your own composite operations built around these primitives.

Write a LookupAndModify, TryModify, AddIfNotExists and other methods built from your lower-level pieces.

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This is something I initially considered but forgot when it came to posting my question. I don't much like using opaque objects as type safety becomes an issue but I suppose as long as the class is carefully constructed it's OK. –  danio Oct 13 '08 at 10:33
    
Opaque items can easily be type safe. You don't have to use void*, you can use MySecretThing* instead. MySecretThing can contain either a lot of private stuff or a void*. –  S.Lott Oct 13 '08 at 12:07

Actually std::set<>::insert() does precisely this. If the value exists, it returns the iterator pointing to the existing item. Otherwise, the iterator where the insertion was made is returned.

It is likely that you are using a similar data structure for fast lookups anyway, so a clean public interface (calling site) will be:

myClass.SetAttribute(value, something)

which always does the right thing. MyClass handles the internal plumbing and clients don't worry about whether the value exists.

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If you look at the use cases provided, they all end up with the same result -- the object is modified and stored. So, why (at this level) expose and complicate the interface by making the client do both checks each time. –  Will Hartung Sep 26 '08 at 5:52
    
I was assuming // use myClass was a clue that something different happened if the value already existed. –  Mark Brackett Oct 10 '08 at 0:19

This assumes that you're setting value to the same "something" in both the Modify and Add cases:

if (!myClass.AddIfNotExists(value, something)) {
   // use myClass
}

Otherwise:

if (myClass.TryModify(value, something)) {
   // use myClass
} else {
   myClass.Add(value, otherSomething);
}
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Thanks for answering. Although your names are better I think that both TryModify & AddIfNotExists suffer the same weakness as LookupAndModify - they are all doing 3 things (lookup, possibly modify, return found) which seems too much for one method to me. –  danio Sep 24 '08 at 13:18
    
That depends on the semantics of the class - which I can't discern from the generic code samples. It's fine (and even preferable in a lot of cases) to design a coarse interface optimized for client usage. How your class does the work (perhaps it has 3 internal methods) is an implementation detail. –  Mark Brackett Sep 24 '08 at 14:13

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