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I have the following test:

TestGet(): _interface(), _db(_interface)
{
    _interface.get = mockGet;
}

which is used when testing this class:

class DB: public IDB
{
public:
   explicit DB(Interface_T& interface):
     _interface(interface)
   {
   }

   ...

private:
   Interface_T _interface;
};

Interface_T is a C interface implemented in a struct and passed to me from a C api. I wish to use the DB class as a wrapper around the C interface.

Notice however that DB copies the interface object to its member _interface. Therefore the line:

_interface.get = mockGet;

has no effect from the DB objects point of view although this was the intention when I wrote the test class. How would you rewrite TestGet() to remedy this error? How would you present to the client of the DB class that it copies the value passed to it?

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Through UML diagram? This will be depicted as Compositon, that should make it pretty obvious to users of the class. –  Alok Save Oct 2 '12 at 8:53
1  
DB doesn't take ownership. It creates a copy and owns its copy. It's unclear what you mean by _interface.get = mockGet having no effect, at least without understanding what you intend it to do. –  jamesdlin Oct 2 '12 at 9:11
    
@jamesdlin The DB class will act as a C++ wrapper for the c interface. –  Baz Oct 2 '12 at 9:14
    
This sounds like homework or exercises in a book. With some transcription erors. Why not reveal the source of the questions. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 2 '12 at 9:16
    
@ Cheers and hth. - Alf Its not! :/ –  Baz Oct 2 '12 at 9:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Presuming that your intention is for TestGet to set a member on the Interface_T object used by DB, you can:

A. Defer construction of DB:

TestGet(): _interface(), _db(NULL)
{
    _interface.get = mockGet;

    // Using a raw pointer here for minimalism, but in practice
    // you should prefer a smart pointer type.
    _db = new DB(_interface);
}

B. If you have control over the Interface_T class, you could add a constructor that initializes Interface_T::get directly. Then you could do:

TestGet(): _interface(mockGet), _db(_interface)
{
}

C. If you have control over the DB class, you could change it to share ownership of the supplied Interface_T (e.g. through boost::shared_ptr), add a constructor as in B, or add an accessor to its internal Interface_T member.

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I would declare _db in the TestGet class with a shared_ptr. I don't want to share ownership of _interface. I want the DB constructor to say to the client that it should be used instead of _interface. This is because the DB class is a wrapper for the C Interface_T class. –  Baz Oct 2 '12 at 9:36
1  
The second can be used even without adding a constructor to Interface_T. Just create a function that returns appropriately prepared Interface_T, probably by value (reasonable compiler will optimize the copy away). –  Jan Hudec Oct 2 '12 at 9:37
    
@Baz: I can't understand what you're trying to say. Maybe actual code would help. –  jamesdlin Oct 2 '12 at 9:43
1  
@JanHudec: A good point, but DB's constructor inexplicably takes a non-const reference as an argument and therefore can't be used with anonymous objects. –  jamesdlin Oct 2 '12 at 9:45
    
@jamesdlin: In this case I'd just const-cast it away. Temporaries are mutable, so it's well defined and it's probably a mistake anyway. –  Jan Hudec Oct 2 '12 at 10:45

So you need the interface to be correct by the time the db get's constructed. Well, it's easy. Just create appropriate interface in a function and pass the result to the constructor:

Interface_T makeMockInterface()
{
    Interface_T interface;
    // I presume you will first use the C API to initialize it and than
    interface.get = mockGet;
}

TestGet() : _db(makeMockInterface())
{
}

The Interface_T is returned by value from makeMockInterface, but since the underlying machine code actually returns objects by copying them to caller-provided space, most compilers will actually elide the copy and construct the object in the caller-provided space directly (this is explicitly allowed by standard).

The TestGet class does not need to have separate _interface member, because the _db contains it and they would not be shared anyway, so no point.

Edit: The DB constructor takes non-const reference, even though all it does is it copies the object and const reference is good enough for that. Fixing the constructor would be preferable, but if it's not an option, I'd cast it to non-const. That either needs two casts:

TestGet() : _db(const_cast<Interface_T &>(static_cast<const Interface_T &>(makeMockInterface())))

or a trivial template helper:

template <typename T>
T &lvalue_cast(const T &v) { return const_cast<T &>(v); }

TestGet() : _db(lvalue_cast(makeMockInterface()))

Since the temporary actually is mutable, just does not bind to non-const references as a safeguard, both are well defined.

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This is based on Jan Hudec comment above:

class TestGet : public ::testing::Test 
{
protected:
   TestGet() 
      :  _db(interfaceFactory())
   {
   }

   Interface_T interfaceFactory()
   {
      Interface_T interface;
      _interface.get = mockGet;
      return interface;
   }

   DB _db;
};

I like this clean approach.

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1  
If DB's constructor takes a non-const reference as you had written, this isn't strictly legal. You could, however, keep the TestGet::Interface_T member and replace interfaceFactory with a Interface_T& modifyInterface() method that modifies and returns it. –  jamesdlin Oct 2 '12 at 10:01
    
@jamesdlin Then I should pass a const reference instead. The C interface contains a list of function pointers and these wont change once the interface is assigned to the DB object. –  Baz Oct 2 '12 at 10:15
    
Passing a const reference doesn't matter. DB's constructor would need to be declared to take a const reference, assuming that you're able to modify the DB definition. (It doesn't make sense for DB's constructor to take a non-const reference anyway since it copies it. Alternatively it could take its Interface_T argument by value, and then it would be obvious to callers that it copies.) –  jamesdlin Oct 2 '12 at 10:43
    
@jamesdlin Yes I mean that DB's constructor takes a const reference. –  Baz Oct 2 '12 at 11:02

There are several ways, all including some kind of inversion of control.

My favourites are :

  • pass the object to the constructor using the reference to the interface
  • use the factory pattern to create the object, and return some kind of shared pointer (using interface again)

Something like this (assuming you have base abstract class):

struct Interface
{
  virtual ~Interface(){}
  virtual void foo() = 0;
};
struct Derived : public Interface
{
  void foo(){}
};

struct A
{
  A ( std::shared_ptr< Interface > obj_ ) : obj( obj_ )
  {}

  std::shared_ptr< Interface > obj;
};

//...
A myA( std::shared_ptr< Interface >( new Derived ) );
// ..

The above example is with passing to the constructor.

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