Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have the following code to declare a queue:

Connection connection = RabbitConnection.getConnection();
Channel channel = connection.createChannel();
channel.queueDeclare(getQueueName(), false, false, false, null);
consumer = new QueueingConsumer(channel);
channel.basicConsume(getQueueName(), true,consumer);

and the following to get the next Delivery object and process it:

    Delivery delivery = null;
    T queue = null;

    //loop over, continuously retrieving messages
    while(true) {

        try {
            delivery = consumer.nextDelivery();
            queue = deserialise(delivery.getBody());

            process(queue);

        } catch (ShutdownSignalException e) {
            logger.warn("Shutodwon signal received.");
            break;
        } catch (ConsumerCancelledException e) {
            logger.warn("Consumer cancelled exception: {}",e.getMessage());
            break;
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            logger.warn("Interuption exception: {}", e);
            break;
        }
    }

The deserialise code. As you can see I'm using Kryo:

public T deserialise(byte[] body) {
    Kryo kryo= new Kryo();
    Input input = new Input(body);
    T deserialised = kryo.readObject(input, getQueueClass());
    input.close();

    return deserialised;
}

If I run this with a queue containing a large number of objects, after approximatelly 2.7 million objects I get an out of memory exception. I found this originally by running it over night with data going in from JMeter at a rate ~90/s which at first it is consuming without any trouble, but in the morning I noticed a large number in RabbitMQ and an out of memory exception on the consumer. I ran it up again and used the Eclipse Memory Analyzer to determine where this memory was being used. From this I can see that the java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue that is referenced by com.rabbitmq.client.QueueingConsumer is growing and growing until it runs out of memory.

Do I need to do anything to tell Rabbit to release resources?

I could increase the heap size but I'm concerned that this is just a short term fix and there might be something in my code that could bite me with a memory leak a few months into production deployment.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

My mistake was that I was setting my channel to auto ack. This mean that every message from Rabbit was getting ack'd (acknologed as being recieved). I have fixed (and tested) this by decalaring the channel to not auto-ack: channel.basicConsume(getQueueName(), false,consumer); and after I process queue, I then ack the message: consumer.getChannel().basicAck(delivery.getEnvelope().getDeliveryTag(), false);.

This is what my queue decleration now looks like:

        Connection connection = RabbitConnection.getConnection();
        Channel channel = connection.createChannel();
        channel.queueDeclare(getQueueName(), false, false, false, null);
        consumer = new QueueingConsumer(channel);
        channel.basicConsume(getQueueName(), false,consumer);

and the following to process the queue:

    Delivery delivery = null;
    T queue = null;

    //loop over, continuously retrieving messages
    while(true) {

        try {
            delivery = consumer.nextDelivery();
            queue = deserialise(delivery.getBody());
            process(queue);
            consumer.getChannel().basicAck(delivery.getEnvelope().getDeliveryTag(), false);

        } catch (ShutdownSignalException e) {
            logger.warn("Shutodwon signal received.");
            break;
        } catch (ConsumerCancelledException e) {
            logger.warn("Consumer cancelled exception: {}",e.getMessage());
            break;
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            logger.warn("Interuption exception: {}", e);
            break;
        } catch (IOException e) {
            logger.error("Could not ack message: {}",e);
            break;
        }
    }

I can now see in the RabbitMQ Management screen that the messages are being delivered at a very high rate but that they are not being ack'd at that rate. If I then kill my consumer, within about 30s all of those non-ack'd messages are moved back to the Ready queue. One of the improvements that I will make is to set the basicQos value: channel.basicQos(10); so that there aren't too many messages delivered but non-ack'd. This is desirable because it means that I can fire up another consumer onto the same queue and start processing the queue rather than it all ending up in memory non-ack'd and not available to other consumers.

share|improve this answer
1  
I dont understand how this solves the memory leak problem – robthewolf Dec 9 '12 at 10:35
1  
@robthewolf If I'm remembering this correctly, this solves the memory leak problem by not having all of the messages sent to the consumer where they are stored up in a memory map consuming more and more memory. By setting the channel to auto-ack, only one message at a time is held in the JVM memory, the rest being stored in the Rabbit Queue. As well as resolving the memory leak, this also makes it possible to add more consumers to handle the load and they will pull messages as and when they have finished processing the previous one. – Arthur Dec 10 '12 at 10:07
1  
you said "By setting the channel to auto-ack" did you mean that you set it to not auto-ack – robthewolf Dec 10 '12 at 11:30
    
@robthewolf You are correct - I meant not auto-ack – Arthur Dec 10 '12 at 16:25

The solution is to set the basicQos - channel.basicQos(2);. My channel declaration now looks like this:

        Connection connection = RabbitConnection.getConnection();
        Channel channel = connection.createChannel();
        channel.queueDeclare(getQueueName(), false, false, false, null);
        consumer = new QueueingConsumer(channel);
        channel.basicConsume(getQueueName(), true,consumer);
        channel.basicQos(2);

Setting basicQos to 2 means only keep 2 messages in the internal memory. For more information and an interesting discussion on using the CoDel algorithm see http://www.rabbitmq.com/blog/2012/05/11/some-queuing-theory-throughput-latency-and-bandwidth/

share|improve this answer
    
According to what I just read then if this solves the problem you were not consuming fast enough in your original code and your buffer was growing very large with messages read of the queue but not yet processed. Changing the QOS to 2 means that only 2 messages will be buffered and the queue will buffer the rest. Does your queue not get very large in this case instead of your memory usage? – robthewolf Oct 2 '12 at 14:47
    
Just been testing this out and the memory is still growing and the queue is not getting larger. It's seems that this isn't doing anything. I don't mind the queue getting large because I can add more consumer and the rate that I'm putting messages on the queue is about 30 times the expected rate. I'm just concerned that if there is a memory leak on the Consumer then I will find out a month into production; probably when I'm on holiday :/ – Arthur Oct 2 '12 at 15:49
    
I am pretty sure this is a GC problem. Some reference to the data is being held and the memory usage is growing with each incoming message. – robthewolf Oct 2 '12 at 16:41

The problem appears to be that your consumer cannot keep up with your producer resulting in your queue growing without limit. You need to limit the size of you queue and slow your producer when the limit is reached. I would also look at optimising your consumer so it can keep up.

share|improve this answer
    
It keeps up just fine for a while; at least the first hour I've watched it and the messages are arriving at ~120/s and being consumed straight away. As I ran this overnight, in the morning I had 4.34 million messages unconsumed in Rabbit. So, I re-started my consumer and it consumed at a rate of over 5000/s before running out of memory after consuming approximately 2.7 million messages. It would seem that the consumer can keep up just fine but it is running out of memory because the LinkedBlockingQueue inside the QueueingConsumer is growing too fast. – Arthur Oct 2 '12 at 9:21
    
If the queue is growing then the consumer cannot possibly be keeping up with the producer. It is possible the consumer is fast enough to start with but slows down over time. – Peter Lawrey Oct 2 '12 at 9:23
    
Ah, now I'm wondering if when I see it is consuming it is actually just placing the messages into memory on the LinkedBlockingQueue and that does not mean it is being properly consumed. That might make sense. – Arthur Oct 2 '12 at 9:23
    
The only natural way to get a task added to a queue is to remove or take it off that queue. – Peter Lawrey Oct 2 '12 at 9:24
    
By the way, this is just from me testing out extreme circumstances that should never happen in production. It's unlikely we'd ever get data at the rate I've been testing and certainly not for any length of time. – Arthur Oct 2 '12 at 9:25

This may be a problem of objects not being destroyed after they are consumed. Can you show the code for deserialize please. I suspect that you are sending objects through queue and deserializing them using some sort of object input stream / byte array input stream. If you are not closing the streams properly that could be causing your memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added the deserialise code to my question. The deserialise code use Kryo. I've been using the Eclipse Memory Analyzer and 99% of the memory is being consumed by LinkedBlockingQueue which is growing all the time. This is referenced by QueueingConsumer. – Arthur Oct 2 '12 at 10:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.